arXiv:hep-ph/0507207v2 3 Aug 2007 · the top quark and Higgs boson mass within the SM. Chapter 3 covers the theoretical description of SM top quark production at hadron colliders - [PDF Document] (2024)

arXiv:hep-ph/0507207v2 3 Aug 2007· the top quark and Higgs boson mass within the SM. Chapter 3 covers the theoretical description of SM top quark production at hadron colliders - [PDF Document] (1)

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Published in: Rep. Prog. Phys. 68 (2005) 2409–2494IEKP-KA/2005-8

Corrections added: August 3, 2007

Top quark physics in hadron collisions

Wolfgang Wagner

Institut fur Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitat Karlsruhe, 76128 Karlsruhe, Germany

E-mail: [emailprotected]

Abstract. The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle observed to date. Its large mass makesthe top quark an ideal laboratory to test predictions of perturbation theory concerning heavy quarkproduction at hadron colliders. The top quark is also a powerful probe for new phenomena beyondthe Standard Model of particle physics. In addition, the top quark mass is a crucial parameterfor scrutinizing the Standard Model in electroweak precision tests and for predicting the mass ofthe yet unobserved Higgs boson. Ten years after the discovery of the top quark at the FermilabTevatron top quark physics has entered an era where detailed measurements of top quark propertiesare undertaken. In this review article an introduction to the phenomenology of top quark productionin hadron collisions is given, the lessons learned in Tevatron Run I are summarized, and first Run IIresults are discussed. A brief outlook to the possibilities of top quark research a the Large HadronCollider, currently under construction at CERN, is included.

PACS numbers: 14.65.Ha

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Contents

1 Introduction 4

2 The top quark in the Standard Model 4

2.1 The standard model of particle physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42.1.1 Electroweak interactions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52.1.2 The Higgs mechanism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72.1.3 Strong interactions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

2.2 Model predictions of top quark properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82.3 Top quark mass and electroweak precision measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92.4 The top quark in flavour physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

3 Top quark production at hadron colliders 14

3.1 tt production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153.1.1 The factorization ansatz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153.1.2 Parametrizations of parton distribution functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163.1.3 The parton cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163.1.4 Soft gluon resummation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

3.2 Single top quark production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203.2.1 W-gluon fusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213.2.2 s-channel production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253.2.3 Associated production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

3.3 Top quark decay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

4 Experimental techniques 28

4.1 The Tevatron Collider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294.2 The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304.3 The DØ Experiment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334.4 Top quark signatures in tt events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354.5 Particle detection and identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

4.5.1 Electrons and muons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374.5.2 Neutrinos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384.5.3 Jets of quarks and gluons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384.5.4 Tagging of b quark jets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

4.6 Generation and simulation of Monte Carlo events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

5 The quest for the top quark 43

5.1 Early searches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435.2 Searches and discovery at the Tevatron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

6 tt cross section measurements 48

6.1 Dilepton channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 486.2 Lepton-plus-jets channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

6.2.1 Topological analyses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 506.2.2 Secondary vertex tag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 526.2.3 Impact parameter tag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 556.2.4 Soft lepton tag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

6.3 All hadronic channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 566.4 Cross section combination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

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7 Top quark mass measurements 58

7.1 Template method in tt lepton-plus-jets events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 587.1.1 Jet energy corrections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 587.1.2 Event-by-event top mass fitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 597.1.3 Final selection and backgrounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 607.1.4 Top mass determination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

7.2 Matrix element method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 627.3 Top quark mass combination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 637.4 Preliminary Run II results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 647.5 Future prospects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

8 Top quark production and decay properties 64

8.1 W helicity in top quark decays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 658.1.1 The lepton pT spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 658.1.2 Measurement of F0 with the matrix element method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 668.1.3 The helicity angle cos θℓW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

8.2 Measurement of Rtb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.3 Search for µτ and eτ top decays in tt events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 688.4 Spin correlations in tt events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 698.5 The top quark pT spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 708.6 Electroweak top quark production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

9 Search for anomalous couplings 73

9.1 Decays to a charged Higgs boson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 739.2 Search for X0 → tt decays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 759.3 FCNC decays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 769.4 Anomalous single top production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

10 Summary and outlook 79

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 4

1. Introduction

The top quark is the by far heaviest of the six fundamental fermions in the Standard Model(SM) of particle physics. Its large mass made the search for the top quark a long and tediousprocess, since accelerators with high centre-of-mass energies are needed. In 1977 the discovery ofthe bottom quark indicated the existence of a third quark generation, and shortly thereafter thequest for the top quark began. Searches were conducted in electron-positron (e+e−) and proton-antiproton (pp) collisions during the 1980s and early 1990s. Finally, in 1995 the top quark wasdiscovered at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider. Subsequently, its mass was precisely measured tobe Mtop = (178.0 ± 4.3)GeV/c2 [1]. The relative precision of this measurement (2.4%) is betterthan our knowledge of any other quark mass. The top quark is about 40 times heavier than thesecond-heaviest quark, the bottom quark. Its huge mass makes the top quark an ideal probe for newphysics beyond the SM. It remains an open question to particle physics research whether the observedmass hierarchy is a result of unknown fundamental particle dynamics. It has been argued that the topquark could be the key to understand the dynamical origin of how particle masses are generated by themechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, since its mass is close to the energy scale at which thebreak down occurs (vacuum expectation value of the Higgs field = 246 GeV) [2]. The most favouredframework to describe electroweak symmetry breaking is the Higgs mechanism. The masses of theHiggs boson, the W boson and the top quark are closely related through higher order corrections tovarious physics processes. A precise knowledge of the top quark mass together with other electroweakprecision measurements can therefore be used to predict the Higgs boson mass.

At present, top quarks can only be directly produced at the Tevatron. The physics results ofthe Tevatron experiments CDF and DØ will therefore be the focus of this article. We review theexperimental status of top quark physics at the beginning of the Tevatron Run II which will yieldconsiderably improved measurements in the top sector. We discuss the first Run II analysis resultsand summarise the lessons learned from Run I data taken between 1990 – 1995.

The outline of this article is as follows: In chapter 2 we give a brief introduction to the SM ofparticle physics and stress the importance of the top quark for higher order corrections to electroweakperturbation theory. In particular, we discuss electroweak precision measurements used to predictthe top quark and Higgs boson mass within the SM. Chapter 3 covers the theoretical description ofSM top quark production at hadron colliders and the top quark decay. In chapter 4 we elaborateon analysis techniques used to detect top quarks in particle detectors. A short description of theTevatron experiments CDF and DØ is provided. In chapter 5 we recall the early searches for the topquark in the 1980s and the discovery at the Tevatron in 1994/95. In chapter 6 we present varioustechniques to measure the top-antitop pair production cross section. Chapter 7 covers the top quarkmass measurements and chapter 8 summarises various advanced tests of top quark properties. Inchapter 9 we discuss the search for anomalous (non SM) top quark production. Previous reviews oftop quark physics can be found in references [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9].

2. The top quark in the Standard Model

2.1. The standard model of particle physics

The Standard Model (SM) of particle physics postulates that all matter be composed of a few basic,point-like and structureless constituents: elementary particles. One distinguishes two groups: quarksand leptons. Both of them are fermions and carry spin 1/2. The quarks come in six different flavours:up, down, charm, strange, top and bottom; formally described by assigning flavour quantum numbers.The SM incorporates six leptons: the electron (e−) and the electron-neutrino (νe), the muon (µ−) andthe muon-neutrino (νµ), the tau (τ−) and the tau-neutrino (ντ ). They carry electron, muon and tau

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 5

Table 1. Three generations of quarks and leptons, their charges and masses are given [10].

Quarks Leptons

Generation Symbol Charge Mass [MeV/c2] Symbol Charge Mass [MeV/c2]

1 u + 23 1.5 to 4 νe 0 < 3 · 10−6

1 d − 13 4 to 8 e− −1 0.51

2 c + 23 (1.15 to 1.35) · 103 νµ 0 < 0.19

2 s − 13 80 to 130 µ− −1 106

3 t + 23 (178.0± 4.3) · 103 ντ 0 < 18.2

3 b − 13 (4.1 to 4.4) · 103 τ− −1 1777

quantum numbers. Quarks and leptons can be grouped into three generations (or families) as shownin table 1 which also contains the charges and masses of the particles. The three generations exhibita striking mass hierarchy, the top quark having by far the highest mass. Understanding the deeperreason behind the hierarchy and generation structure is one of the open questions of particle physics.Each quark and each lepton has an associated antiparticle with the same mass but opposite charge.The antiquarks are denoted u, d, etc. The antiparticle of the electron is the positron (e+).

The forces of nature acting between quarks and leptons are described by quantized fields. Theinteractions between elementary particles are due to the exchange of field quanta which are saidto mediate the forces. The SM incorporates the electromagnetic force, responsible for example forthe emission of light from excited atoms, the weak force, which for instance causes nuclear betadecay, and the strong force which keeps nuclei stable. Gravitation is not included in the frameworkof the SM but rather described by the theory of general relativity. All particles with mass orenergy feel the gravitational force. However, due to the weakness of gravitation with respect tothe other forces acting in elementary particle reactions it is not further considered in this article. Theelectromagnetic, weak and strong forces are described by so called quantum gauge field theories (seeexplanation below). The quanta of these fields carry spin 1 and are therefore called gauge bosons.The electromagnetic force is mediated by the massless photon (γ), the weak force by the massiveW±,MW = (80.425 ± 0.038) GeV/c2 [10], and the Z0, MZ = (91.1876 ± 0.0021) GeV/c2 [10], and thestrong force by eight massless gluons (g). Quarks participate in electromagnetic, weak and stronginteractions. All leptons experience the weak force, the charged ones also feel the electromagneticforce. But leptons do not take part in strong interactions. A thorough introduction to the SM can befound in various text books of particle physics [11, 12, 13, 14, 15].

2.1.1. Electroweak interactions. In quantum field theory quarks and leptons are represented byspinor fields Ψ which are functions of the continuous space-time coordinates xµ. To take into accountthat the weak interaction only couples to the left-handed particles, left- and right-handed fieldsΨL = 1

2 (1 − γ5)Ψ and ΨR = 12 (1 + γ5)Ψ are introduced. The left-handed states of one generation

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 6

are grouped into weak-isospin doublets, the right-handed states form singlets:(

ud

)

L

(

cs

)

L

(

tb

)

L

(

νee

)

L

(

νµµ

)

L

(

νττ

)

L

uR cR tRdR sR bR eR µR τR

The weak-isospin assignment for the doublet is: up-type quarks (u,c,t) and neutrinos carry T3 = + 12 ;

down-type quarks (d,s,b), electron, muon and tau lepton have T3 = − 12 . In the original SM the right-

handed neutrino states are omitted, since neutrinos are assumed to be massless. Recent experimentalevidence [16, 17, 18], however, strongly indicates that neutrinos have mass and the SM needs to beextended in this respect.

The dynamics of the electromagnetic and weak forces follow from the free particle Lagrangiandensity

L0 = i Ψ γµ∂µ Ψ (1)

by demanding the invariance of L0 under local phase transformations:

ΨL −→ eigα(x)·T+ig′β(x)Y ΨL and ΨR −→ eig′β(x)Y ΨR . (2)

For historical reasons these transformations are also referred to as gauge transformations. In (2) theparameter α(x) is an arbitrary three-component vector and T = (T1, T2, T3)

t is the weak-isospinoperator whose components Ti are the generators of SU(2)L symmetry transformations. The index Lindicates that the phase transformations act only on left-handed states. The matrix representationsare given by Ti =

12 τi where the τi are the Pauli matrices. The Ti do not commute: [Ti, Tj ] = i ǫijk Tk.

That is why the SU(2)L gauge group is said to be non-Abelian. β(x) is a one-dimensional function of x.Y is the weak hypercharge which satisfies the relation Q = T3 + Y/2, where Q is the electromagneticcharge. Y is the generator of the symmetry group U(1)Y . Demanding the Lagrangian L0 to beinvariant under the combined gauge transformations of SU(2)L×U(1)Y , see (2), requires the additionof terms to the free Lagrangian which involve four additional vector (spin 1) fields: the isotripletWµ = (W1µ ,W2µ ,W3µ)

t for SU(2)L and the singlet Bµ for U(1)Y . This is technically done byreplacing the derivative ∂µ in L0 by the covariant derivative

Dµ = ∂µ + i gWµ ·T+ i g′1

2BµY (3)

and adding the kinetic energy terms of the gauge fields: − 14Wµν ·Wµν− 1

4Bµν ·Bµν . The field tensorsWµν and Bµν are given by Wµν = ∂µWν − ∂νWµ − g ·Wµ ×Wν and Bµν = ∂µBν − ∂νBµ. Sincethe vector fields Wµ and Bµ are introduced via gauge transformations they are called gauge fieldsand the quanta of these fields are named gauge bosons. For an electron-neutrino pair, for example,the resulting Lagrangian is:

L1 = i

(

νee

)

L

γµ[

∂µ + i gWµ ·T+ i g′ YL1

2Bµ

](

νee

)

L

+

i eR γµ[

∂µ − g′ YR1

2Bµ

]

eR − 1

4Wµν ·Wµν − 1

4Bµν ·Bµν (4)

This model developed by Glashow [19], Weinberg and Salam [20, 21] in the 1960s allows to describeelectromagnetic and weak interactions in one framework. One therefore refers to it as unifiedelectroweak theory.

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 7

2.1.2. The Higgs mechanism. One has to note, however, that L1 describes only massless gaugebosons and massless fermions. Mass-terms such as 1

2M2BµB

µ or −mΨΨ are not gauge invariant andtherefore cannot be added. To include massive particles into the model in a gauge invariant way theHiggs mechanism is used. Four scalar fields are added to the theory in form of the isospin doublet

Φ =(

φ+, φ0)t

where φ+ and φ0 are complex fields. This is the minimal choice. The term LH =

|DµΦ|2−V (Φ†Φ) is added to L1. The scalar potential takes the form V (Φ†Φ) = µ2 Φ†Φ+λ (Φ†Φ)2.In most cases particle reactions cannot be calculated from first principles. One rather has to use

perturbation theory and expand a solution starting from the ground state of the system which is inparticle physics called the vacuum expectation value. The parameters µ and λ can be chosen such

that the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs potential V is different from zero: |Φvac| =√

− 12 µ

2/λ

and thus does not share the symmetry of V . The scalar Higgs fields inside Φ are redefined such thatthe new fields, ξ(x) = (ξ1(x), ξ2(x), ξ3(x))

t and H(x), have zero vacuum expectation value. Whenthe new parameterization of Φ is inserted into the Lagrangian, the symmetry of the Lagrangian isbroken, that is, the Lagrangian is not an even function of the Higgs fields anymore. This mechanismwhere the ground states do not share the symmetry of the Lagrangian is called spontaneous symmetrybreaking. As a result, one of the Higgs fields, the H(x) field, has acquired mass, while the other threefields, ξ, remain massless [22, 23].

Applying spontaneous symmetry breaking as described above to the combined LagrangianL2 = L1 + LH and enforcing local gauge invariance of L2, makes three electroweak gauge bosonsacquire mass. This is the aim of the whole formalism. One field, the photon field, remains massless.The resulting boson fields after spontaneous symmetry breaking are, however, not the original fieldsWµ and Bµ but rather mixtures of those: the W±

µ = (W 1µ ∓ i W 2

µ)/√2, the Z0 and the photon field

Aµ:(

)

=

(

cos θW sin θW− sin θW cos θW

) (

W 3µ

)

(5)

The mixing angle θW is the Weinberg angle defined by the coupling constants g′/g = tan θW . Whilethe original massless vector fields have two degrees of freedom (transverse polarizations), the newmassive fields acquired a third degree of freedom, their longitudinal polarization. The longitudinalmodes of the W± and the Z0 are due to the disappearance of the ξ states from the theory. The totalnumber of degrees of freedom is thus conserved.

Spontaneous symmetry breaking also generates lepton masses if Yukawa interaction terms of thelepton and Higgs fields are added to the Lagrangian:

LleptonYukawa = −Ge

[

eR

(

Φ†

(

νee

)

L

)

+(

(νe, e)t

LΦ)

eR

]

(6)

Here the Yukawa terms for the electron-neutrino doublet are given as an example. Ge is a furthercoupling constant describing the coupling of the electron and electron-neutrino to the Higgs field. Inthis formalism neutrinos are assumed to be massless.

Quark masses are also generated by adding Yukawa terms to the Lagrangian. However, for thequarks both, the upper and the lower member of the weak-isospin doublet, need to acquire mass.For this to happen an additional conjugate Higgs multiplet has to be constructed: Φc = iτ2Φ

∗ =(φ0

,−φ−)t. The Yukawa terms for the quarks are given by:

LquarkYukawa =

3∑

i=1

3∑

j=1

Gij uiRֆ(

ujdj

)

L

+Gij diR Φ†

(

ujdj

)

L

+ h.c. (7)

The uj and dj are the weak eigenstates of the up-type (u, c, t) and the down-type (d, s, b)quarks, respectively. Couplings between quarks of different generations are allowed by this ansatz.

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 8

After spontaneous symmetry breaking the Yukawa terms produce mass terms for the quarkswhich can be described by mass matrices in generation space: (u1, u2, u3)R Mu (u1, u2, u3)

tL and

(d1, d2, d3)R Md (d1, d2, d3)tL with Mu

ij = |Φvac| · Gij and Mdij = |Φvac| ·Gij . The mass matrices are

non-diagonal but can be diagonalized by unitary transformations, which essentially means to changebasis from weak eigenstates to mass eigenstates, which are identical to the flavour eigenstates u, c,t and d, s, b. In charged-current interactions (W± exchange) this leads to transitions between masseigenstates of different generations referred to as generation mixing. It is possible to set weak andmass eigenstates equal for the up-type quarks and ascribe the mixing entirely to the down-type quarks:

d′

s′

b′

L

= V

dsb

L

=

Vud Vus VubVcd Vcs VcbVtd Vts Vtb

dsb

L

(8)

where d′, s′ and b′ are the weak eigenstates. The mixing matrix V is called the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix [24].

2.1.3. Strong interactions. The theory of strong interactions is called quantum chromodynamics(QCD) since it attributes a colour charge to the quarks. There are three different types of strongcharges (colours): “red”, “green” and “blue”. Strong interactions conserve the flavour of quarks.Leptons do not carry colour at all, they are inert with respect to strong interactions. QCD is aquantum field theory based on the non-Abelian gauge group SU(3)C of phase transformations on thequark colour fields. Invoking local gauge invariance of the Lagrangian yields eight massless gaugebosons: the gluons. The gauge symmetry is exact and not broken as in the case of weak interactions.Each gluon carries one unit of colour and one unit of anticolour. The strong force binds quarkstogether to form bound-states called hadrons. There are two groups of hadrons: mesons consisting ofa quark and an antiquark and baryons built of either three quarks or three antiquarks. All hadronsare colour-singlet states. Quarks cannot exist as free particles. This experimental fact is summarisedin the notion of quark confinement: quarks are confined to exist in hadrons.

2.2. Model predictions of top quark properties

In 1975 the tau lepton was the first particle of the third generation to be discovered [25]. Only twoyears later, in 1977, a new heavy meson, the Υ, was discovered [26]. It was quickly recognised tocontain a new fifth quark, the b quark (Υ = bb). After these discoveries the doublet structure ofthe SM strongly suggested the existence of a third neutrino associated with the tau lepton and theexistence of a sixth quark, called the top quark. The properties of the b quark and b hadrons weresubject to extensive experimental research in the past 25 years. As a result, charge and weak isospinof the b quark are well established quantities: Qb = − 1

3 and T3 = − 12 . The charge Qb was first

deduced from measurements of the cross section σhad for hadron production on the Υ resonance atthe DORIS e+e− storage ring [27, 28, 29]. The integral over σhad is related to the leptonic widthΓee of the Υ:

σhad dM = 6 π2Γee/M2Υ (using the approximation that Γhad ≈ Γtotal). Nonrelativistic

potential models of the Υ relate Γee to the charge of the constituent b quarks.The weak isospin of the b quark was obtained from the measurement of the forward-backward

asymmetry AFB in e+e− → bb reactions. The asymmetry is defined as the difference in rate of bquarks produced in the forward hemisphere (polar angle θ > 90◦) minus the rate of b quarks producedin the backward hemisphere (θ < 90◦) over the sum of the two rates. In 1984 the JADE experimentmeasured AFB = (−22.8± 6.0± 2.5)% [30] in excellent agreement with the value of -25.2% predictedfor a b quark that is the lower member of a SM weak isospin doublet. In case of a weak isospin singletthe asymmetry would be zero. The assignment of quantum numbers for the b quark allows to predictthe charge and the weak isospin of the top quark to be: Qt = + 2

3 and T3 = + 12 .

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 9

(a) (b) (c)

f

f

f

Zaxial

γ

γ

Z0

t

Z0

t

Z0 t

t

W−

b

b

Figure 1. (a) An example of a fermion triangle diagram. (b,c) Two example Feynman diagramsof radiative corrections involving the top quark. (b) is a radiative correction to the Z0 propagator.(c) shows a vertex correction to the decay Z0 → bb.

Another argument which supported the existence of a complete third quark generation comes fromperturbation theory. In particle physics the terms of a perturbation series are depicted in Feynmandiagrams. The first order terms are pictured as tree level diagrams. Higher order terms correspondto loop diagrams. Certain loop diagrams are divergent. These divergencies can only be overcome bysumming up over several divergent terms in a consistent manner and have the divergencies cancel eachother. This formalism is called renormalization. For electroweak theory to be renormalizable, the sumover fermion triangle diagrams, such as the one shown in figure 1a, has to vanish [31, 32, 33]. Witha third lepton doublet in place the cancellation only occurs if also a complete third quark doublet isthere. While the SM predicts the charge and the weak isospin of the top quark, its mass remains afree parameter.

2.3. Top quark mass and electroweak precision measurements

Even though the top quark mass is not predicted by the SM it enters as a parameter in the calculationof radiative corrections to electroweak processes. With highly precise measurements at hand itis therefore possible to indirectly determine the top quark mass from those processes [34, 35]. Inthis context radiative corrections denote higher order contributions to a perturbation series, e.g. tocalculate cross sections of electroweak processes.

The most precise electroweak measurements are available from e+e− colliders operating at the Z0

pole, where√s =MZ . Here

√s is the centre-of-mass energy of the colliding electrons and positrons.

MZ is the mass of the Z0 boson. In the 1990s there were two particle colliders operating on the Z0 pole:the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) [36] at CERN with four experiments (ALEPH [37, 38],DELPHI [39, 40], L3 [41, 42] and OPAL [43]) and the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) [44] with theSLD [45, 46] experiment. The LEP experiments collected about 4 million Z0 events each, SLD on theorder of 0.5 million events. Although the SLD sample is considerably smaller, the experiment reacheda competitive sensitivity for many measurements, since at SLC it was possible to polarize the collidingelectrons and positrons.

Two examples of radiative corrections to the Z0 propagator and to the Z0 vertex involving thetop quark are given in figure 1b and 1c. The top mass plays a particular large role in the correctionsrepresented by these diagrams due to the large mass difference between the top quark and its weak-isospin partner, the b quark. The correction terms introduce a quadratic dependence on the top mass,whereas the dependence on the Higgs mass is only logarithmic. The LEP electroweak working group

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 10

(LEPEWWG) has combined the measurements of the four LEP experiments to obtain a common dataset. To test SM predictions and check the overall consistency of the data with the model the SLDdata and Tevatron measurements in pp collisions are included [47]. Among the results of the fits is anindirect determination of the top mass and indirect limits on the Higgs mass. The quantities used fora constraint fit to the SM are discussed below:

(i) The mass MZ and the total width ΓZ of the Z0. The definition of MZ and ΓZ is based on theBreit-Wigner denominator of the electroweak cross section for fermion pair (f f) production dueto Z0 exchange: σff (s) = σ0

f · sΓ2Z/((s−M2

Z)2 + (sΓZ/MZ)

2) where σ0f is the pole cross section

at√s =MZ .

(ii) The hadronic pole cross section:

σ0h =

12 π

M2Z

· Γee Γhad

Γ2Z

where Γee and Γhad are the partial widths for the Z0 decaying into electrons or hadrons,respectively.

(iii) The ratio of the hadronic and leptonic widths at the Z0 pole: R0ℓ ≡ Γhad/Γℓℓ. Γℓℓ is obtained

from Z0 decays into e+ e−, µ+ µ− or τ+ τ− assuming lepton universality (Γee = Γµµ = Γττ ≡ Γℓℓ)which is only correct for massless leptons. To account for the tau mass Γττ is corrected, in averageby 0.2%.

(iv) The pole forward-backward asymmetry A0,ℓFB (ℓ ∈ {e, µ, τ}) for Z0 decays into charged leptons.

The asymmetry is defined as the total cross section for a negative lepton to be scattered intothe forward direction (90◦ < θ ≤ 180◦) minus the total cross section for a negative lepton to bescattered into the backward direction (0◦ ≤ θ ≤ 90◦) divided by the sum.

A0,lFB =

σF(ℓ−, 90◦ < θ ≤ 180◦)− σB(ℓ

−, 0◦ ≤ θ ≤ 90◦)

σF(ℓ−, 90◦ < θ ≤ 180◦) + σB(ℓ−, 0◦ ≤ θ ≤ 90◦)

Here θ is the angle between the produced lepton and the incoming electron. The forward-backwardasymmetry originates from parity violating terms in the total cross section. A0,ℓ

FB can be written

as a combination of effective couplings A0,ℓFB = 3

4 ·Ae Aℓ with Aℓ = (2 gV,ℓ gA,ℓ)/(g2V,ℓ+g

2A,ℓ) where

gV,ℓ and gA,ℓ are the vector and axial couplings, respectively.

(v) The effective leptonic coupling Aℓ derived from the tau polarization measurement. Parityviolation in the weak interaction leads to longitudinally polarized final state fermions fromthe Z0 decay. In case of the decay Z0 → τ+τ− this polarization can be measured via thesubsequent parity violating decays of the tau as polarimeter. The polarization Pτ is defined interms of the cross section for the production of right-handed and left-handed τ−, respectively:Pτ = (σR − σL)/(σR + σL). Averaging Pτ over all production angles θ gives a measure of theeffective coupling: 〈Pτ 〉 = −Aτ .

(vi) The effective leptonic weak mixing angle sin2 θlepteff from the inclusive hadronic charge asymmetry〈QFB〉 which is measured from Z0 → qq decays. An estimator for the quark charge is derivedfrom the sum of momentum weighted track charges in the quark and antiquark hemispheres,respectively.

(vii) The effective leptonic coupling Aℓ derived from left-right asymmetries measured withlongitudinally polarized electron and positron beams at SLD. The left-right asymmetry ALR

is formed as the number of Z0 bosons NL produced by left-handed electrons minus the numberof Z0 bosons NR produced by right-handed electrons:

ALR =NL −NR

NL +NR· 1

Pe

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 11

Physicalquantity

Measurementwith total error

SM fitPhysicalquantity

Measurementwith total error

SM fit

LEP measurements LEP and SLD heavy flavour

MZ [GeV/c2] 91.1875 ± 0.0021 91.1875 R0b 0.21630 ± 0.00065 0.21562

ΓZ [GeV/c2] 2.4952 ± 0.0023 2.4966 R0c 0.1723 ± 0.0031 0.1723

σ0h [nb] 41.540 ± 0.037 41.481 A0, b

FB 0.0998 ± 0.0017 0.1040

R0ℓ 20.767 ± 0.025 20.739 A0, c

FB 0.0706 ± 0.0035 0.0744

A0,ℓFB 0.0171 ± 0.0010 0.0165 Ab 0.923 ± 0.020 0.935

Aℓ (〈Pτ 〉) 0.1465 ± 0.0033 0.1483 Ac 0.670 ± 0.026 0.668

sin2 θlepeff (〈QFB〉) 0.2324 ± 0.0012 0.2314

SLD only measurements UA2, Tevatron and LEP2 measurements

Aℓ 0.1513 ± 0.0021 0.1483 MW [GeV/c2] 80.425 ± 0.034 80.394

Tevatron only measurements ΓW [GeV/c2] 2.133 ± 0.069 2.093

Mtop [GeV/c2] 178.0 ± 4.3 178.1

Table 2. Experimental input to overall fits to the SM by the LEP electro-weak working group [47].The experimental values of the physical quantities, which are described in detail in the text, aregiven with the total error. The results of the constraint fit to all data is given in the columns named“SM fit”. In the fit the Higgs mass is treated as a free parameter.

Additionally, one divides by the luminosity weighted polarization Pe of the electron beam. ALR

is measured for all three charged lepton final states. The pole values A0LR are equivalent to the

effective couplings Ae, Aµ and Aτ , respectively. Assuming lepton universality the results arecombined to form a single value Aℓ.

(viii) The measurement of the top mass by CDF and DØ [1].

(ix) The ratios of b and c quark partial widths of the Z0 with respect to its total hadronic partialwidth: R0

b ≡ Γbb/Γhad and R0c ≡ Γcc/Γhad.

(x) The forward-backward asymmetries for the decays Z0 → bb and Z0 → cc: A0,bFB and A0,c

FB, definedanalogously to the leptonic asymmetries.

(xi) The effective couplings for b and c quarks: Ab and Ac, defined analogously to Aℓ.

(xii) The mass and width of the W boson from the combination of measurements in pp collisions byUA2, CDF and DØ and measurements at LEP 2.

The quantities describing the decay Z0 → bb (R0b , A

0,bFB and Ab) exhibit a particular strong dependence

on Mtop because they are sensitive to weak vertex corrections as the one shown in figure 1c. In manycases vertex corrections involving a W boson are suppressed due to small CKM matrix elements. Thevertices in figure 1, however, contain the matrix element Vtb which is close to 1. Therefore, the graphslead to significant corrections depending on the top quark mass.

The measured values of the above listed quantities are given in table. 2. Other input quantitiesnot shown in the table are the Fermi constant GF , the electromagnetic coupling constant at the Z0

mass scale, α(M2Z), and the fermion masses. The Higgs mass and the strong coupling constant at the

Z0 mass scale, αs(M2Z), are treated as free parameters in the fits. Detailed reviews of electroweak

physics at LEP are, for instance, given in references [48, 49].

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 12

(a) (b)

140

160

180

200

10 102

103

mH [GeV]

mt

[GeV

]

Excluded Preliminary (a)

High Q2 except mt

68% CL

mt (TEVATRON)

80.2

80.3

80.4

80.5

80.6

130 150 170 190 210

mH [GeV]114 300 1000

mt [GeV]

mW

[G

eV]

Preliminary

68% CL

∆α

LEP1, SLD Data

LEP2, pp− Data

Figure 2. Results of fits to electroweak data [47]. Direct Higgs boson searches at LEP2 and thetop mass measurement at the Tevatron are summarised in these plots. (a) shows the plane “topmass versus Higgs mass”. The light shaded area is excluded by direct searches for the Higgs bosonat LEP2. The dark shaded area is given by the central value of the direct top mass measurement atthe Tevatron and its errors. The dashed line encloses the region preferred by the electroweak dataat 68% confidence level. (b) shows the “MW versus Mtop” plane. The full line encloses the areapreferred by the SM fit to data from LEP1 and SLD. The dashed contour indicates the result of theLEP2, UA2 and Tevatron W mass measurements and the direct top quark mass measurement. Theplot also shows the SM relationship of the masses as function of the Higgs boson mass.

If the top mass is left floating in the fit it is possible to obtain a prediction for Mtop from themodel based on all other measurements. Comparing this prediction with the direct measurement fromCDF and DØ is an important cross-check of the SM. The fit yields a value of Mtop = 179+12

−9 GeV/c2

which is in very good agreement with the measured value of Mtop = (178.0± 4.3) GeV/c2. The resultof the fit is depicted in figure 2a where Mtop is plotted versus MH . The plot shows that the overlapregion of the direct measurement with the indirect determination prefers a low value for the Higgsmass. It is obvious from the diagram that there is a large positive correlation, about 70%, betweenthe top quark and the Higgs boson mass.

The constraint on the Higgs mass becomes significantly stronger if the measured value for Mtop

is included in the SM fit. Only MH and αS(M2Z) are free parameters in this case. The resulting value

for the Higgs mass is: MH = 114+69−45 GeV/c2, a value close to the exclusion limit obtained by direct

searches at LEP2 which yield MH > 114.4 GeV/c2 [50]. The SM fit (not using the direct searchresult) yields an upper limit of MH < 260 GeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level. The SM predictionfor all observables resulting from the constrained fit is given in table 2.

The last fit discussed here is the one made with MW and Mtop left as free parameters. The resultis shown in figure 2b which also includes SM predictions for Higgs masses from 114 to 1000 GeV/c2.The direct measurement of MW and Mtop are in fair agreement with the indirect determination. Alow Higgs mass is preferred. The dependence of the W mass on the top and Higgs mass is introducedvia loop diagrams like the ones shown in figure 3. As becomes clear from figure 2 increasing theprecision of the direct measurements of MW and Mtop is a precondition to gain higher leverage forSM predictions of the Higgs mass.

Summarising this section on electroweak precision measurements we point out two major issues

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 13

W

t

W

b�

W

H

W

Figure 3. Examples of loop diagrams of the W propagator introducing a dependence of the Wmass on the top and Higgs mass.

with respect to the top quark. First, the very good agreement of the predicted value for Mtop basedon higher order electroweak corrections with the direct measurement is a significant success of theSM. Second, more precise measurements of Mtop and MW are needed to obtain tighter constraints onthe Higgs boson mass. This is one of the major physics motivations for the Run II of the Tevatron.

2.4. The top quark in flavour physics

Flavour physics describes the transitions between quarks of different flavour. These transitions alwaysinvolve the exchange of a W boson. They are charged current interactions. Higher order transitions ofthis kind involve loops in which particles can occur that are much heavier than the hadrons involvedin the interaction. Diagrams with down-type quarks (d, s and b) in the loops cancel each other via theGIM mechanism very effectively, since they are nearly degenerate in their masses. The large degree ofmass splitting in the up-quark sector prevents the cancellation and leads to sizeable loop contributions,e.g. in radiative B meson decays. One other example where the top quark plays a prominent role isthe mixing of neutral B mesons.

The phenomenon of particle-antiparticle mixing has been experimentally established in the neutralkaon system (K0–K0) and the B0

d–B0d system [51, 52]. Mixing is also expected to take place in the D0–

D0 and B0s–B

0s system, but was not observed yet. Only limits were set [53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61].

Mixing changes the flavour quantum number (strange, charm, bottom) of the mesons by two units(∆S = 2, ∆C = 2, ∆B = 2). A neutral meson is produced in a well defined flavour eigenstate |P 0〉 or|P 0〉 with P ∈ {K,D,Bd, Bs}. This initial state evolves due to second order weak interactions into atime-dependent quantum superposition of the two flavour eigenstates: |P (t)〉 = a(t) |P 0〉+ b(t) |P 0〉.The time-evolution of the coefficients a(t) and b(t) is given by the effective Hamiltonian matrixH = M− i/2 Γ :

i∂

∂t

(

a(t)b(t)

)

=

(

M− i

) (

a(t)b(t)

)

(9)

M and Γ are 2×2 Hermitian matrices denoted as mass and decay matrix, respectively. CPT invariancerequires M11 = M22 = M and Γ11 = Γ22 = Γ, where M and Γ are the mass and the decay width ofthe flavour eigenstates.

In case of the B meson systems (B0d–B

0d and B0

s–B0s ) the transition amplitude for the mixing

matrix is dominated by box diagrams involving the top quark, see figure 4. All up-type quarks(q = u, c, t) can be exchanged in the box and contribute in general to the mixing amplitude. In thecase of B mesons it is, however, found that the mixing is strongly dominated by the diagrams withtwo top quarks in the loop as shown in figure 4. All other diagrams involving at least one u- or c-quarkcan be neglected with respect to the top-top diagram [62, 63, 64]. As a side remark: In the neutralkaon system the case is different. Charm and top quark box diagrams as well as intermediate virtualpion states contribute significantly to the mixing. For B mixing the off-diagonal elements of M and

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 14

W

t

W

t

q = d; s

b

b

q = d; s

W

t

W

t

q = d, s

b

b

q = d, s

Figure 4. Lowest order Feynman diagrams for B meson mixing. A B0 (bd) or a B0s (bs) oscillates

into a B0 (bd) or a B0s (bs), respectively.

Γ, 〈B0q |H∆B=2

eff |B0q 〉 =M12− i/2 Γ12 (q ∈ {d, s}), are in very good approximation given by [62, 64, 10]:

M12,q = − G2FM

2W

12 π2mBq

f2BqBBq

ηB ·(

V ∗tq Vtb

)2 · S0(xt) (10)

Γ12,q =G2

F

8 πm2

bmBqf2BqBBq

η′B ·[

(

V ∗tqVtb

)2+ V ∗

tqVtbV∗cqVcb O

(

m2c

m2b

)

+

(

V ∗cqVcb

)2 O(

m4c

m4b

)]

(11)

where GF is the Fermi constant andMW the W mass. mb and mc are the b quark and c quark masses,respectively. mBq

represents the masses of the B0d and B0

s mesons. fBqis the decay constant and BBq

the bag parameter introduced as a correction factor to hadronic matrix elements. The Vij are the CKMmatrix elements. xt = (Mtop/MW )2 is the squared ratio of top quark mass over W mass. The functionS0(xt) is an Inami-Lim function [65] and can be well approximated by S0(xt) = 0.784 x0.76t [66].The parameters ηB and η′B represent QCD corrections to the box diagram. The mass eigenstatesBh (h for heavy) and Bl (l for light) diagonalize the effective Hamiltonian H and are given by:|Bh〉 = p |B0〉 − q |B0〉 and |Bl〉 = p |B0〉 + q |B0〉 with q2 = M∗

12 − i/2 Γ∗12 and p2 = M12 − i/2 Γ∗

12.Mixing experiments do not determine the massesmh andml but rather the mass difference between thetwo ∆m = mh−ml which is in good approximation (about 1% accuracy) theoretically predicted to be∆m = 2 |M12| [64]. This quantity depends on the top quark mass via ηBS0(xt). To give a flavour of thedependency: ηBS0(xt) changes from roughly 1.1 for Mtop = 150 GeV to 1.7 at Mtop = 200 GeV [67].

Historically, the ARGUS measurement of B0d–B

0d mixing yielded a mass difference ∆md found to

be surprisingly large [52]. Using the dependence of ∆md on the top quark mass several authorsinterpreted this measurement as a hint of a large top quark mass [68, 69, 70, 71, 72].

The dependence on Mtop drops out if the ratio

∆ms

∆md=mBs

f2BsBBs

mBdf2BdBBd

·∣

VtsVtd

2

(12)

is taken. Once ∆ms is measured in Bs mixing this relation will allow to extract the absolute value ofthe ratio Vts/Vtd with good precision.

3. Top quark production at hadron colliders

In this chapter we present the phenomenology of top quark production at hadron colliders. We limitthe discussion to SM processes. Anomalous top quark production and non-SM decays will be coveredin chapter 9. Specific theoretical cross section predictions refer to the Fermilab Tevatron, running at√s = 1.8 TeV (Run I) or

√s = 1.96 TeV (Run II), or to the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 15

at CERN (√s = 14 TeV). In the intermediate future the Tevatron and the LHC are the only two

colliders where SM top quark production can be observed.The two basic production modes of top quarks at hadron colliders are the production of tt

pairs, which is dominated by the strong interaction, and the production of single top quarks due toelectroweak interactions.

3.1. tt production

We discuss only top quark pair production via the strong interaction. tt pairs can also be producedby electroweak interactions if a Z0 or a photon are exchanged between the in- and outgoing quarks.However, at a hadron collider the cross sections for theses processes are completely negligible comparedto the QCD cross section. The cross section for the pair production of heavy quarks has been calculatedin perturbative QCD, i.e. as a perturbation series in the QCD running coupling constant αs(µ

2). Theresults are applicable to the bottom and to the top quark. In the following we will refer only to ttproduction, the scope of this article.

3.1.1. The factorization ansatz The underlying theoretical framework of the calculation is the partonmodel which regards a high-energy hadron A, in our case a proton or antiproton, as a compositionof quasi-free partons (quarks and gluons) which share the longitudinal hadron momentum pA. Theparton i has the longitudinal momentum pi, i.e. it carries the momentum fraction xi = pi/pA. Thecross section calculation is based on the factorization theorem stating that the cross section is givenby the convolution of parton distribution functions (PDF) fi(x, µ

2) for the colliding hadrons (A, B)and the hard parton-parton cross section σij :

σ(AB → tt) =∑

i,j

dxidxj fi,A(xi, µ2)fj,B(xj , µ

2) · σij(ij → tt; s, µ2) (13)

The hadrons AB are either pp (at the Tevatron) or pp (at the LHC). The parton distribution functionfi,A(xi, µ

2) describes the probability density for finding a parton i inside the hadron A carrying alongitudinal momentum fraction xi.

The parton distribution functions and the parton-parton cross section σij depend on thefactorization and renormalization scale µ. For calculating heavy quark production the scale is usuallyset to be of the order of the heavy quark mass, here specifically µ = Mtop. Strictly speaking onehas to distinguish between the factorization scale µF introduced by the factorization ansatz and therenormalization scale µR due to the renormalization procedure invoked to regulate divergent termsin the perturbation series when calculating the parton-parton cross section σij . Since both scales areto some extent arbitrary parameters most authors have adopted the practice to use only one scaleµ = µF = µR in their calculations. If the complete perturbation series could be calculated, theresult for the cross section would be independent of µ. However, since calculations are performed atfinite order in perturbation theory, cross section predictions do in general depend on the choice of µ.The µ-dependence is usually tested by varying the scale between µ = Mtop/2 and µ = 2Mtop. Thevariations in the cross section are quoted as an indicative theoretical uncertainty of the prediction,but should not be mistaken for Gaussian errors.

In (13) the variable s denotes the square of the centre-of-mass energy of the colliding partons:s = xixj(pA + pB)

2. In symmetric colliders, where pA = pB = p, we have s = 4 xixjp2 = xixjs.

The sum in (13) runs over all pairs of light partons (i, j) contributing to the process. Thefactorization scheme serves as a method to systematically eliminate collinear divergencies from theparton cross section σij and absorb them into the parton distribution functions. A detailed theoreticaljustification for the applicability of the factorization ansatz to heavy quark production can be foundin reference [73]. According to this analysis effects such as an intrinsic heavy quark component in the

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 16

x0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1

)2µ

x f

(x,

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

1

1.2

1.4

1.6

1.8

2

upupbargluon

x0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1

)2µ

x f

(x,

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

1

1.2

1.4

1.6

1.8

2

downdownbargluon

Figure 5. Parton distribution functions (PDFs) of u quarks, u quarks, d quarks, d quarks andgluons inside the proton. The parametrization is CTEQ3M [75]. The scale at which the PDFs areevaluated was chosen to be µ = 175 GeV (µ2 = 30625 GeV2).

hadron wave function and flavour excitation processes like qt→ qt do not lead to a breakdown of theconventional factorization formula.

3.1.2. Parametrizations of parton distribution functions The PDFs are extracted from measurementsin deep inelastic scattering experiments where either electrons, positrons or neutrinos collide withnucleons. A variety of experiments of this kind have been conducted since the late 1960s and providedhard evidence for the parton (quark) model in the first place. During the 1990s the experimentsZEUS and H1 [74] at the ep storage ring HERA at DESY have reached an outstanding precision inmeasurements of the proton structure, which meant a big leap forward for the prediction of crosssections at hadron colliders.

Several parametrizations of proton PDFs have been extracted from the experimental databy different groups of physicists. As an example figure 5 shows PDFs of the CTEQ3Mparametrization [75]. Plotted are the distributions most relevant for pp and pp collisions, the PDFsfor u, u, d, d and the gluons. For antiprotons the distributions in figure 5 have to be reversed betweenquark and antiquark. The scale µ was chosen to be µ = 175 GeV. One sees that the gluons start todominate in the x region below 0.15. The tt production cross section at the Tevatron is dominated bythe large x region, since the top quark mass is relatively large compared to the Tevatron beam energy(Mtop/

√s = 0.0875). At the LHC (Mtop/

√s = 0.0125) the lower x region becomes more important.

There are differences between the various sets of PDF parametrizations. To give the reader a quan-titative impression we compare the CTEQ3M, MRSR2 and MRSD parametrizations in figure 6. Asa representative example we plot the ratios fu(x)MRSR2/fu(x)CTEQ3M and fu(x)MRSD/fu(x)CTEQ3M

for up-quarks as well as fg(x)MRSR2/fg(x)CTEQ3M and fg(x)MRSD/fg(x)CTEQ3M for gluons. Thesethree PDF parametrizations were chosen because they are used for predictions of the tt cross sectionat the Tevatron [76, 77, 78]. Typical differences are on the order of 5 to 10%.

3.1.3. The parton cross section The cross section σ of the hard, i.e. short distance, parton-partonprocess ij → tt can be calculated in perturbative QCD. The leading order processes, contributingwith α2

s to the perturbation series, are quark-antiquark annihilation, qq → tt, and gluon fusion,gg → tt. The corresponding Feynman diagrams for these processes are depicted in figure 7.

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 17

x0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

1

1.2

1.4

up MRSR2/CTEQ3M

up MRSD/CTEQ3M

x0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

1

1.2

1.4

gluon MRSR2/CTEQ3M

gluon MRSD/CTEQ3M

Figure 6. Comparison of the CTEQ3M, MRSR2 and MRSD parametrizations for the PDF of theup quark and the gluon. The left plot shows the ratios fu(x)MRSR2/fu(x)CTEQ3M (full line) andfu(x)MRSD/fu(x)CTEQ3M (dashed line). On the right hand side we plot fg(x)MRSR2/fg(x)CTEQ3M

(full line) and fg(x)MRSD/fg(x)CTEQ3M (dashed line). The factorization scale is set to µ2 =30625 GeV2.

q

q

t

t

g

g

t

t

g

g

t

t

g

g

t

t

Figure 7. Feynman diagrams of the leading order processes for tt production: quark-antiquarkannihilation (qq → tt) and gluon fusion (gg → tt).

The leading order (Born) cross sections for heavy quark production were calculated in the late1970s [79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84], most of them having charm production as a concrete application inmind. The differential cross section for quark-antiquark annihilation is given by

dt(qq → tt) =

4 π α2s

9 s4·[

(m2 − t)2 + (m2 − u)2 + 2m2s]

(14)

where s, t and u are the Lorentz-invariant Mandelstam variables of the process. They are defined bys = (pq + p q)

2, t = (pq − pt)2 and u = (pq − p t)

2 with pi being the corresponding momentum 4-vectorof the quark i. m denotes the top quark mass. The differential cross section for the gluon-gluon fusionprocess is given by:

dt(g1g2 → tt) =

π α2s

8 s2·

»

6(m2− t)(m2

− u)

s2−

m2(s− 4m2)

3 (m2− t)(m2

− u)

+4

3·(m2

− t)(m2− u)− 2m2(m2 + t)

(m2− t)2

+4

3·(m2

− t)(m2− u)− 2m2(m2 + u)

(m2− u)2

−3 ·(m2

− t)(m2− u)−m2(u− t)

s (m2− t)2

− 3 ·(m2

− t)(m2− u)−m2(t− u)

s (m2− u)2

(15)

The invariant variables are in this case s = (pg1 + pg2)2, t = (pg1 − pt)

2 and u = (pg1 − p t)2. The

cross sections in (14) and (15) are quoted in the form given in reference [11]. The invariants t and u

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 18

(a) (b) (c) (d)

q

q

t

t

q

q

t

t

g

g

g

t

t

g

g

t

g

t

Figure 8. Example Feynman diagrams of next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections to quark-antiquark annihilation and gluon fusion. a) and c) show virtual corrections, b) and d) gluonbremsstrahlung graphs.

may be expressed in terms of the cosine of the scattering angle θ in the parton-parton centre-of-masssystem:

cos θ =

1− 4 p2⊥s

t = − s2(1− cos θ) u = − s

2(1 + cos θ) (16)

where p⊥ is the common transverse momentum of the outgoing top quarks.A full calculation of next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections contributing in order α3

s to theinclusive parton-parton cross section for heavy quark pair production was performed independentlyby two groups: Nason et al. in 1988 [85] and Beenakker et al. in 1991 [86, 87], yielding consistentresults. The NLO calculations involve virtual contributions to the leading order processes, gluonbremsstrahlung processes (qq → tt+ g and gg → tt+ g) as well as processes like g + q(q) → tt+ q(q).Examples of Feynman diagrams of NLO processes are given in figure 8: a) and c) display two virtualgraphs, b) and d) two gluon bremsstrahlung graphs. α3

s corrections arise when interfering those graphswith the leading order graphs of figure 7. For the NLO calculation of the hadron-hadron cross sectionσ(AB → tt) to be consistent one has to use next-to-leading order determinations of the couplingconstant αs and the PDFs. All quantities have to be consistently defined in the same renormalizationscheme because different approaches distribute the radiative corrections differently among the parton-parton cross section, the PDFs and αs. Most authors use the MS or an extension of the MS scheme.First NLO cross section predictions for tt production at the Tevatron (

√s = 1.8 TeV) yielded values

of about 4 pb [88, 87, 89, 90]At energies close to the kinematic threshold, s = 4M2

top, the quark-antiquark annihilation processis the dominant one, if the incoming quarks are valence quarks, as is the case of pp collisions. Atthe Tevatron 80 to 90% of the tt cross section is due to quark-antiquark annihilation [78, 77, 91].At higher energies the gluon-gluon fusion process dominates for both pp and pp collisions. That iswhy one can built the LHC as a pp machine without compromising the parton-parton cross section.Technically, it is of course much easier to operate a pp collider, since one spares the major challengeto produce high antiproton currents in a storage ring. For the Tevatron the ratio of NLO over LOcross sections for gluon-gluon fusion is predicted to be 1.8 atMtop = 175 GeV/c2, for quark-antiquarkannihilation the value is only about 1.2 [78]. Since the annihilation process is dominating, the overallNLO enhancement is about 1.25.

3.1.4. Soft gluon resummation Contributions to the total cross section due to radiative correctionsare large in the region near threshold (s = 4M2

top) and at high energies (s > 400 M2top). Near

threshold the cross section is enhanced due to initial state gluon bremsstrahlung (ISGB) [92]. Thiseffect is important for tt production at the Tevatron, but not for the LHC where gluon splitting and

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 19

Table 3. Cross section predictions for tt production at next-to-leading order (NLO) in perturbationtheory including the resummation of initial state gluon bremsstrahlung (ISGB). The predictions aregiven for a top mass of Mtop = 175 GeV/c2. The cross sections are given for pp collisions at theTevatron (

√s = 1.8 TeV and

√s = 1.96 TeV) and pp collisions at the LHC (

√s = 14 TeV). The

factorization and renormalization scale is set to µ = Mtop to derive the central values. It has tobe stressed that the authors use different sets of PDF parametrizations. Part of the differences canbe attributed to this fact. In reference [78] Laenen et al. do not provide a direct prediction forMtop = 175 GeV/c2. To compare their prediction with those of other authors I choose to linearlyinterpolate the given values for Mtop = 174 GeV/c2 and Mtop = 176 GeV/c2, thereby neglecting thefunctional form of the mass dependence. Within the assigned errors this simplification is acceptable.

Group√s PDF set σ(tt) Reference

(1) Laenen at al. 1.8 TeV MRSD ’ 4.95+0.70−0.42 pb [78]

(2) Berger and Contopanagos 1.8 TeV CTEQ3M 5.52+0.07−0.45 pb [93, 94, 76]

(3) Bonciani et al. 1.8 TeV CTEQ6M 5.19+0.52−0.68 pb [91]

(4) Kidonakis et al. 1.8 TeV MRST2002 (5.24± 0.31) pb [99]

(2) Berger and Contopanagos 2.0 TeV CTEQ3M 7.56+0.10−0.55 pb [94, 76]

(3) Bonciani et al. 1.96 TeV CTEQ6M 6.70+0.71−0.88 pb [91]

(4) Kidonakis et al. 1.96 TeV MRST2002 (6.77± 0.42) pb [99]

(2) Berger and Contopanagos 14.0 TeV CTEQ3M 760 pb [94, 76]

(3) Bonciani et al. 14.0 TeV MRSR2 833+52−39 pb [77]

(4) Kidonakis et al. 14.0 TeV MRST2002 870 pb [99]

flavour excitation are increasingly important effects. The calculation at fixed next-to-leading order(α3

s) perturbation theory has been refined to systematically incorporate higher order corrections dueto soft gluon radiation. Technically, this is done by applying an integral transform (Mellin transform)to the cross section:

σN (tt) ≡∫ 1

dρ ρN−1 σ(ρ; tt) (17)

where ρ = 4M2top/s is a dimensionless parameter. In Mellin moment space the corrections due to

soft gluon radiation are given by a power series of logarithms lnN . For µ = Mtop the correctionsare positive at all orders. Therefore, the resummation of the soft gluon logarithms yields an increaseof the tt cross section with respect to the NLO value. Four different groups have presented crosssection predictions based on the resummation of soft gluon contributions: (1) Laenen et al. [92, 78], (2)Berger and Contopanagos [93, 94, 76], (3) Bonciani et al. (BCMN) [95, 96, 77, 91] and (4) Kidonakiset al. [97, 98, 99]. Their predictions for Mtop = 175 GeV/c2 are summarised in table 3.

In the region very close to the kinematic threshold non-perturbative effects become dominant andthe perturbative approach breaks down. The resummation can therefore not sensibly be extended into

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 20

this region. That is why Laenen et al. introduce a new scale µ0 with ΛQCD ≪ µ0 ≪ Mtop wherethey stop the resummation. The concrete choice of scale is to some extent arbitrary. The uncertaintyquoted by Laenen et al. is derived by varying the scale µ0. To calculate the central value of thecross section they use µ0 = 0.1Mtop for qq-annihilation and µ0 = 0.25Mtop for gg-fusion. The valuesare not required to be the same, since the respective perturbation series have different convergenceproperties.

Berger and Contopanagos derive the infra-red cut-off µ0 within their calculation and therebydefine a perturbative region where resummation can be applied. Since µ0 is derived, it is not treatedas a source of error in this approach. The theoretical uncertainty quoted by Berger and Contopanagosis derived by varying the factorization and renormalization scale µ between 0.5Mtop and 2Mtop. Thecentral value, given in table 3, is calculated using the CTEQ3M PDFs. The uncertainty due to thechoice of the PDF parametrization is about 4%. Resummation effects are of appreciable size: Theresummed total cross sections (for

√s = 1.8 TeV and

√s = 2.0 TeV, respectively) are about 9% above

the NLO cross sections. Berger and Contopanagos predict an increase of 37% in cross section, whengoing from

√s = 1.8 TeV to

√s = 2.0 TeV in Run II of the Tevatron. The cross section value for the

LHC, σ = 760 pb, merely reflects an estimate and is not accompanied by an uncertainty. Due to themuch larger centre-of-mass energy at the LHC the near threshold region is much less important for ttproduction, reducing the significance of ISGB and the need for resummation of these contributions.

While the first two groups have only resummed leading logarithmic terms (LL), BCMN alsoinclude next-to-leading logarithms (NLL). They used a different resummation prescription which doesnot demand the introduction of an additional infra-red cut-off µ0 [95]. The LL result of BCMNshows only an increase of about 1% compared to the NLO cross section at the Tevatron [96]. Whentaking NLL terms into account the increase is 4% [77]. In table 3 we quote the NLL results asupdated in reference [91] with the newest set of PDFs. The errors quoted by BCMN include PDFuncertainties, which are evaluated by using sets of PDF parametrizations that provide an estimate of“1-σ” uncertainties. In the case of CTEQ [100, 101] 40 different sets are available, for MRST [102]there are 30 sets. Kidonakis et al. resum leading and subleading logarithms up to order α4

s in anattempt to reduce the dependence of the cross-section on the renormalization scale µ compared tothe NLO calculation. The uncertainty quoted by Kidonakis et al. is dominated by the choice of thekinematic description of the scattering process, either in one-particle-inclusive or pair-invariant-masskinematics. The Tevatron predictions given in table 3 are the average of the two choices. The LHCprediction is based on the one-particle-inclusive value, since this is believed to be more appropriatewhen the cross section is dominated by gluon-gluon fusion.

The cross section predictions are strongly dependent on the top quark mass, which is illustratedin figure 9. The plot shows the predictions for the Tevatron at

√s = 1.8 TeV, they are in good

agreement within the given errors. For comparison the Run I measurements of CDF [103, 104] andDØ [105, 106] are shown. Within the large errors the measurements agree well with the theoreticalpredictions. It is obvious that a precise cross section measurement has to be accompanied by a precisemeasurement of the top quark mass to provide a basis for a stringent test of the theory.

3.2. Single top quark production

Top quarks can be produced singly via electroweak interactions involving the Wtb vertex. There arethree production modes which are distinguished by the virtuality Q2 of the W boson (Q2 = −q2,where q is the four-momentum of the W ):

(i) the t-channel (q2 = t ): A virtual W strikes a b quark (a sea quark) inside the proton. TheW boson is spacelike (q2 < 0). This mode is also known as W-gluon fusion, since the b quarkoriginates from a gluon splitting into a bb pair. Feynman diagrams representing this process are

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 21

[ GeV ]topm155 160 165 170 175 180 185 190 195

( t

tbar

) [

pb

2

4

6

8

10

CDF

D0

Berger / Contop.

Bonciani et al.

Kidonakis et al.

= 1.80 TeV sRun 1

Figure 9. The tt cross section at√s = 1.8 TeV as a function of the top quark mass. The thick

full line represents the central value predicted by Catani et al. [96, 77]. The thick dashed line showsthe prediction by Berger and Contopanagos [94]. The thick dashed-dotted line is the prediction byKidonakis et al. [99]. The thin lines indicate the upper and lower uncertainties of the predictions.The Run I measurements of CDF [103, 104] and DØ [105, 106] are shown for comparison.

shown in figure 10a and figure 10b . W -gluon fusion is the dominant production mode, both atthe Tevatron and at the LHC, as will be shown in the discussion below.

(ii) the s-channel (q2 = s ): This production mode is of Drell-Yan type. A timelike W boson withq2 ≥ (Mtop+mb)

2 is produced by the fusion of two quarks belonging to an SU(2) isospin doublet.See figure 10c for the Feynman diagram.

(iii) associated production: The top quark is produced in association with a real (or close to real)W boson (q2 = M2

W ). The initial b quark is a sea quark inside the proton. Figure 10d showsthe Feynman diagram. The cross section is negligible at the Tevatron, but of considerable size atLHC energies where associated production even supercedes the s-channel.

In pp and pp collisions the cross section is dominated by contributions from up and down quarkscoupling to the W boson on one hand side of the Feynman diagrams. That is why the (u, d ) quarkdoublet is shown in the graphs of figure 10. There is of course also a small contribution from the secondweak isospin quark doublet, (c, s); an effect of about 2% for s- and 6% for t-channel production [107].Furthermore, we will only consider single top quark production via a Wtb vertex. The productionchannels involving aWtd or aWts vertex are strongly suppressed due to small CKM matrix elements:0.0048 < |Vtd| < 0.014 and 0.037 < |Vts| < 0.043 [10]. Thus, their contribution to the total crosssection is quite small: ∼ 0.1% and ∼ 1%, respectively [108]. In the following paragraphs we will reviewthe theoretical cross section predictions for the three single top processes and the methods with whichthey are obtained.

3.2.1. W-gluon fusion TheW -gluon fusion process was already suggested as a potentially interestingsource of top quarks in the mid 1980s [109, 110] and early 1990s [111]. If the b quark is taken to bemassless, a singularity arises when computing the diagram in figure 10a in case the final b quarkis collinear with the incoming gluon. In reality the non-zero mass of the b quark regulates this

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 22

(a) (b) (c) (d)

b

W

+

g

u (d)

b

t

d (u)

W

+

t

g

u (d)

t

b

d (u)

W

+

d

u

b

t

b W

g

b t

Figure 10. Representative Feynman diagrams for the three single top production modes. a) andb) show W -gluon fusion graphs, c) the s-channel process and d) associated production. We choseto draw the graphs in a), b) and c) with the (u, d) weak-isospin doublet coupling to the W . This isby far the dominating contribution. In general, also the (c, s) doublet contributes. The graphs showsingle top quark production, the diagrams for single antitop quark production can be obtained byinterchanging quarks and antiquarks.

(a) (b) (c)

W

+

b

u (d)

t

d (u)

W

+

b

u (d)

t

d (u)

W

+

b

u (d)

t

g

d (u)

Figure 11. a) shows the leading order Feynman diagram for W gluon fusion if the perturbativecalculation is performed involving a b quark distribution function. b) and c) show two examples ofαs corrections to the leading order diagram. b) is a correction to the b vertex, c) a correction to thelight quark vertex.

collinear divergence. When calculating the total cross section the collinear singularity manifests itselfas terms proportional to ln((Q2 +M2

top)/m2b) with Q2 = −q2 being the virtuality of the W boson.

These logarithmic terms cause the perturbation series to converge rather slowly. This difficulty canbe obviated by introducing a parton distribution function (PDF) for the b quark, b(x, µ2), whicheffectively resums the logarithms to all orders of perturbation theory and implicitly describes thesplitting of gluons into bb pairs inside the colliding hadrons [112, 113]. Once a b quark distributionfunction is introduced into the calculation, the leading order process is qi + b → qj + t as shown infigure11a. In this formalism the process shown in figure 10a is a higher order correction which isalready partially included in the b-quark distribution function. The remaining contribution is of order1/ ln((Q2 +M2

top)/m2b) with respect to the leading order process in figure 11a. Additionally, there are

also corrections of order αs: Two examples of those are shown in figure 11b and figure 11c. The leadingorder differential cross section calculated from the Feynman graph in figure 11a for quark-quark orantiquark-antiquark collisions is given by [109]:

dσij

dt=π α2

w

4· |Vij |2 |Vtb|2 ·

s−M2top

(s−m2b) (t−M2

W )2(18)

For quark-antiquark collisions the result is:

dσij

dt=π α2

w

4· |Vij |2 |Vtb|2 ·

u−m2b

(s−m2b)

2

u−M2top

(t−M2W )2

(19)

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 23

Table 4. Predicted total cross sections for single top quark production processes. The cross sectionsare given for pp collisions at the Tevatron (

√s = 1.8 TeV or

√s = 1.96 TeV) and pp collisions at the

LHC (√s = 14 TeV). The cross sections of the t- and s-channel process are taken from reference [116]

and were evaluated with CTEQ5M1 PDFs. The uncertainties were evaluated in reference [117]. Thevalues for associated production are taken from reference [118] (Tevatron at

√s = 1.96 TeV and

LHC) and reference. [107] (Tevatron at√s = 1.8 TeV). All cross sections are given for a top quark

mass of Mtop = 175 GeV/c2.

Process√s σ(t− channel) σ(s− channel) σ(Wt)

pp→ t/t 1.80 TeV 1.45+0.20−0.16 pb (0.75± 0.10) pb 0.14+0.05

−0.02 pb

pp→ t/t 1.96 TeV 1.98+0.28−0.22 pb (0.88± 0.11) pb 0.094+0.015

−0.012 pb

pp→ t 14.0 TeV (156± 8) pb (6.6± 0.6) pb 14.0+3.8−2.8 pb

pp→ t 14.0 TeV (91± 5) pb (4.1± 0.4) pb 14.0+3.8−2.8 pb

αw = g2w/(4 π) is the weak fine structure constant. The Mandelstam variable t is given by

t = − s2

(

1− m2b

s

)

(

1−M2

top

s

)

· (1 − cos θ) (20)

and s+ t+ u = m2b +M2

top. Another leading order calculations of the cross section was done van derHeide et al. [114].

The NLO calculation at first order in αs comprises the square of the Born terms, (18) and (19),plus the interference with the virtual graphs plus the square of the real graphs with one single QCDcoupling, e.g. figure 11c. Bordes and van Eijk presented an NLO calculation based on the formalismdescribed above in 1995 [112]. They predict an enhancement of +28% of the NLO cross section overthe Born cross section for the Tevatron operating at

√s = 1.8 TeV. Bordes and van Eijk used small

masses for gluons and quarks to regularize infrared and collinear divergencies. Mass factorizationwas performed in the deep inelastic scattering (DIS) scheme. Stelzer et al. [113, 115] performed anNLO calculation entirely based on the MS factorization scheme. They predict a decrease of the crosssection when going from leading order to NLO by about -8% to -10%.

The latest calculation was done by Harris et al. in 2002 [116] and contains full differentialinformation, such that experimental acceptance cuts and jet definitions can be applied. Their resultsare summarised in table 4. We quote only these latest results for the cross sections, since previouscalculations used different PDFs, which by itself leads to big differences in the predicted values. Harriset al. compare their results with those given by Stelzer et al. using the latest PDFs. The agreement isvery good, within 1%. The cross sections given for the Tevatron are the sum of top and antitop quarkproduction. In pp collisions at the LHC the W -gluon fusion cross section differs for top and antitopquark production, which are therefore treated separately in table 4. The increase in the centre-of-massenergy from 1.80 TeV to 1.96 TeV in Run II of the Tevatron is predicted to yield a 33% increase inthe total cross section. The ratio of σWg/σtt is about 30%, for the Tevatron as well as for the LHC.The uncertainties quoted in table 4 are evaluated in reference [117] and include the uncertainties dueto the factorization scale µ, the choice of PDF parameterization, and the uncertainty in the top quarkmass. The factorization scale uncertainty is ±4% at the Tevatron and ±3% at the LHC. The central

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 24

value was calculated with µ2 = Q2 +M2top for the b quark PDF. The scale for the light quark PDFs

was set to µ2 = Q2.Of course the t-channel single top cross section depends on the top quark mass. The current

uncertainty in the top quark mass (∆m = 4.3GeV/c2) corresponds to about 7% uncertainty in thecross section at the Tevatron and 3% at the LHC. The dependence is approximately linear in therelevant mass range.

At first glance it is astonishing that the cross section for W -gluon fusion is of the same order ofmagnitude as tt production although it is a weak interaction process. There are several issues thatlead to this relative enhancement [109]:

(i) The parton cross section of the W -gluon fusion mode scales like 1/M2W as opposed to the tt

cross section which, as a typical strong interaction process, scales like 1/s. At the Tevatronthe subprocess energies are not much greater than MW , so one does not gain from the scalingbehaviour. However, at the LHC the effect is present.

(ii) Single top production is kinematically enhanced compared to tt production, since only one heavytop quark is produced. For single top quark production the parton distribution functions aretherefore typically evaluated at half of the value of x needed for the strong process. Since thePDFs are monotonically decreasing functions, see figure 5, single top quark production is relativelyenhanced to tt pair production.

(iii) The W -gluon fusion process is enhanced by logarithmic terms originating from the collinearsingularity discussed above.

In general, W -gluon fusion events have three quark jets originating from the hard interaction:(1) the b quark jet from the top quark decay, (2) the light quark jet, and (3) the b-quark jet whichcomes from the initial gluon splitting. The transverse momentum distribution of these jets is shownin figure 12a. The b quark is most of the times the hardest jet, the peak of the distribution is around60 GeV. The light quark pt distribution peaks around 25 GeV, but has a long tail to high values. Theb quark pt distribution peaks at low values. A large share of the b jets will therefore not be identified,since an experimental analysis will require some lower pt cut off, typically at 15 GeV.

An interesting feature of single top quark production (in the t-channel and in the s-channel)is that in its rest frame the top quark is 100% polarized along the direction of the d quark (dquark) [119, 120, 107, 115]. The reason for this is that the W boson couples only to fermions withleft-handed chirality. Consequently, the ideal basis to study the top quark spin is the one which usesthe direction of the d quark as the spin axis [120]. In pp collisions at the Tevatron W -gluon fusionproceeds via ug → dtb in 77% of the cases. The d quark can then be measured by the light quarkjet in the event. The top quark spin is best analyzed in the spectator basis for which the spin axisis defined along the light quark jet direction. However, 23% of the events proceed via dg → utb, inwhich case the d-quark is moving along one of the beam directions. For these events the spectatorbasis is not ideal, but since the light quark jet occurs typically at high rapidity the dilution is small.In total, the top quark has a net spin polarization of 96% along the direction of the light quark jetin t-channel single top quark production [120]. In s-channel events the best choice is the antiprotonbeam direction as spin basis. In 98% of the cases the top quark spin is aligned in the antiprotondirection [120].

At the Tevatron top quarks are not produced as ultrarelativistic particles. Therefore, the chiralityeigenstates are not identical to the helicity eigenstates. The spin asymmetry A = (N↑−N↓)/(N↑+N↓)is 0.91 for the t-channel and 0.96 for the s-channel.

Since the top quark does not hadronize, its decay products carry information about the top quarkpolarization. A suitable variable to investigate the top quark polarization is the angular distributionof electrons and muons originating from the decay chain t → W+ + b, W+ → ℓ+ + νℓ. If θqℓ is theangle between the charged lepton momentum and the light quark jet axis in the top quark rest frame,

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 25

a) b)

j

b

b

p

T

(GeV)

d

=

d

p

T

(

f

b

/

G

e

V

)

120100806040200

40

35

30

25

20

15

10

5

Ba kground

Single top

os �

d

=

d

o

s

(

f

b

)

1.00.50.0-0.5-1.0

2.0

1.5

1.0

0.5

0.0

Figure 12. (a) Transverse momentum (pt) distribution of the quark jets from W -gluon fusionevents: (1) the b quark from the top quark decay (solid line), (2) the light quark jet (dotted line),and (3) the b quark from the gluon splitting. The distributions are calculated for the Tevatronat

√s = 2TeV. (b) Angular distribution of the charged lepton in W -gluon fusion events at the

Tevatron (√s = 2TeV). θ is the angle between the lepton momentum and the light quark jet axis.

For comparison the same distribution is shown for the sum of all background processes (W + jj andtt). Both plots, a) and b), are taken from reference [115].

(a) (b) (c) (d)

W

+

d

u

b

t

W

+

d

u

b

g

t

W

+

g

u (d)

d (u)

b

t

W

+

g

u (d)

t

b

d (u)

Figure 13. Examples of αs-corrections to the s-channel single top production mode.

the angular distribution is given by 0.5 (1+cos θqℓ). A theoretical prediction for this quantity is shownin figure 12b [115]. Single top quark events show a distinct slope which differs significantly from thenearly flat background.

3.2.2. s-channel production The s-channel production mode of single top quarks probes acomplementary aspect of the weak charged current interaction of the top quark, since it is mediatedby a timelike W boson with q2 ≥ (Mtop +mb)

2 as opposed to a spacelike W boson in the t-channelprocess. The leading order s-channel process is depicted in figure 10c. Feynman diagrams yieldingcorrections of order αs are shown in figure 13. The first order corrections depicted in figure 13c andfigure 13d have the same initial and final states as the W-gluon fusion diagrams shown in figure 10aand figure 10b. However, these two classes of diagrams do not interfere because they have a different

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 26

colour structure. The tb pair in theW -gluon fusion process is in a colour-octet state, since it originatesfrom a gluon. In s-channel production the tb pair forms a colour-singlet because it comes from a W .The different colour structure implies that both groups of processes must be separately gauge invariantand, therefore, they cannot interfere [109, 111, 107].

Several groups have calculated the cross section for the s-channel production mode in leading ornext-to-leading order, respectively [121, 122, 107, 123, 116]. The leading order result for the partoniccross section is given by [121]

σij(s) =π αw

2· |Vij |2 |V 2

tb| ·

q20 −M2top

(s−M2W )

2 ·(

q0 −M2

top + 2 q20

3√s

)

with q0 ≡s+M2

top −m2b

2√s

. (21)

In table 4 we quote the latest NLO results by Harris et al. [116] which are in very good agreementwith the earlier calculations by Smith/Willenbrock [122] and Mrenna/Yuan [123]. The later authorshave resummed soft gluon emission terms in the s-channel cross section. Their resummed crosssection is about 3% above the NLO value. The predictions for the s-channel cross section have asmaller uncertainty from the PDFs than for the t-channel because they do not depend as strongly ongluon distribution functions as the t-channel calculation does. The uncertainty in the top quark massleads to an uncertainty in the cross section of about 10% (∆m = 4.3GeV/c2,

√s = 1.96 TeV)) [117].

The ratio of cross sections for the t-channel and s-channel mode is 2.3 at the Tevatron(√s = 1.96 TeV) and 23 at the LHC. In pp collisions the gluon initiated processes, tt production

and W -gluon fusion, dominate by far over s-channel single top quark production which is a quark-antiquark annihilation process. The s-channel signal will therefore most likely be obscured at theLHC. Thus, it will be essential to observe s-channel single top quark production at the Tevatron.

3.2.3. Associated production The third single top quark production mode is characterised by theassociated production of a top quark and an on-shell (or close to on-shell) W boson. Studyingassociated production is interesting, since it probes a different kinematic region of the Wtb interactionvertex than s-channel or t-channel production and thereby provides complementary information.Predictions for the cross sections are given in table 4. The calculation by T. Tait [118] includeshigher order corrections proportional to 1/ ln(M2

top/m2b). The prescription is very similar to the one

described in section 3.2.1 for the t-channel mode. However, it is not a full NLO calculation. Taitprovides predictions for the Tevatron (

√s = 2.00 TeV) and the LHC (

√s = 14 TeV). It is obvious

from these numbers that associated production is negligible at the Tevatron, but is quite important atthe LHC where it even exceeds the s-channel production rate. The errors quoted in table 4 include theuncertainty due to the choice of the factorization scale (±15% at the LHC) and the parton distributionfunctions (±8% at the LHC). The uncertainty in the top mass (∆m = 5GeV/c2) causes a spread ofthe cross section by ±9% at the LHC. A second calculation by Belyaev and Boos yields a much highercross section for associated production: σ(W t/t) = 62.0+16.6

−3.6 pb [124]. This result was obtained usingthe CompHEP program [125]. First studies [118] show that associated single top quark productionwill be observable at the LHC with data corresponding to about 1 fb−1 of integrated luminosity.

3.3. Top quark decay

In the SM top quarks decay predominantly into a b quark and a W boson. The decays t → d +W+

and t → s+W+ are CKM suppressed relatively to t → b+W+ by factors of |Vtd|2 and |Vts|2. If weassume the CKM matrix to be unitary the values of these matrix elements can be inferred from othermeasured matrix elements: 0.0048 < |Vtd| < 0.014 and 0.037 < |Vts| < 0.043 [10]. In the discussionof the following paragraphs we will therefore only consider the decay t→ b+W+. Potential non-SMdecays which would signal new physics will be discussed in section 9.

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 27

At Born level the amplitude of the decay t→ b+W+ is given by

M(t→ b+W ) =i g√2b ǫµWγµ

1− γ52

t . (22)

The decay amplitude is dominated by the contribution from longitudinalW bosons because the decayrate of the longitudinal component scales with M3

top. In contrast, the top quark decay rate intotransverse W bosons increases only linearly with Mtop. In both cases the W+ couples solely to bquarks of left-handed chirality (a general feature of the SM). Since the b quark is effectively massless,compared to the mass scale set by Mtop, left-handed chirality translates into left-handed helicity forthe b quark. If the b quark is emitted anti-parallel to the top quark spin axis, the W+ must belongitudinally polarized, hW = 0, to conserve angular momentum. If the b quark is emitted parallelto the top quark spin axis, the W+ boson has helicity hW = −1 and is transversely polarized. Thus,elementary angular momentum conservation forbids the production ofW bosons with positive helicity,hW = +1, in top quark decays. The ratios of decay rates into the three W helicity states are givenby [8]:

A(hW = −1) : A(hW = 0) : A(hW = +1) = 1 :M2

top

2M2W

: 0. (23)

Strong next-to-leading order corrections to the decay rate ratios have been calculated, lowering thefraction of longitudinal W bosons by 1.1% and increasing the fraction of left-handed W bosons by2.2% [126, 127]. Electroweak and finite widths effects have even smaller effects on the helicity ratios,inducing corrections at the per-mille level [128]. For the decay of antitop quarks negative helicity isforbidden. In the SM the top quark decay rate, including first order QCD corrections, is given by

Γt =GF M3

top

8 π√2

|Vtb|2(

1− M2W

M2top

)2 (

1 + 2M2

W

M2top

) [

1− 2αs

3 π· f (y)

]

(24)

with y = (MW /Mtop)2 and f(y) = 2 π2/3 − 2.5 − 3y + 4.5y2 − 3y2 ln y [8, 129, 130]. Using

y = (80.45/174.3)2 we find f(y) = 3.85. The QCD corrections of order αs lower the Born decay rateby −10%. A useful approximation of (24) is given by Γtop ≃ 175 MeV/c2 · (Mtop/MW )3 [8, 131]. Thedecay width increases from 1.07 GeV/c2 atMtop = 160 GeV/c2 to 1.53 GeV/c2 atMtop = 180 GeV/c2.Expression (24) neglects higher order terms proportional to m2

b/M2top and α2

s. Corrections of order α2s

were lately calculated, they lower Γtop by about -2% [132, 133]. Because the top quark width is smallcompared to its mass, interference between QCD corrections to production and decay amplitudes hasa small effect of order O(αsΓtop/Mtop) [134]. The decay width for events with hard gluon radiation(Eg > 20GeV) in the final state has been estimated to be 5 – 10% of Γtop, depending on the gluon jetdefinition (cone size ∆R = 0.5 to 1.0) [135]. Electroweak corrections to Γtop have also been calculatedand increase the decay width by δEW = +1.7% [136, 137]. Taking the finite width of the W bosoninto account leads to a negative correction δΓ = −1.5% such that δEW and δΓ almost cancel eachother [138].

The large top decay rate implies a very short lifetime of τtop = 1/Γtop ≈ 4 · 10−25 s which issmaller than the characteristic formation time of hadrons τform ≈ 1/ΛQCD ≈ 2 · 10−24 s. In otherwords top quarks decay before they can couple hadronically to light quarks and form hadrons. Thelifetime of tt bound states, toponium, is too small, Γtt ∼ 2 Γtop, to allow for a proper definition of abound state with sharp binding energy. This feature of a heavy top quark was already pointed out inthe early and mid 1980s [139, 140, 131].

Even though top hadrons cannot be formed, there are other long-distance QCD effects associatedwith hadronization which have to be considered. The colour structure of the hard interaction processinfluences the subsequent fragmentation and hadronization process. In the process e+e− → tt thetop and antitop quark are produced in a colour-singlet state. In hadronic collisions, on the contrary,

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 28

the production cross section is dominated by configurations where the t or t forms a colour-singletwith the proton or antiproton remnant, respectively. The colour field – or in the picture of stringfragmentation – the string carries the more energy the further the top quark and the remnant areapart. If the distance in the top-remnant centre-of-mass system reaches about 1 fm before the topquark decays, the colour string carries enough energy to form light hadrons. Whether or whethernot a significant fraction of top events exhibit the described “early” fragmentation process, dependsstrongly on the centre-of-mass energy of the hadron collider. While at Tevatron energies early topquark fragmentation effects are negligible [141], they may well play a role at the LHC, where topquarks are produced with a large Lorentz boost. If there is no early fragmentation, long-range QCDeffects connect the top quark decay products, the b quarks or the quarks from hadronic W decays.Even if early fragmentation happens, the fragmentation of heavy quarks is hard, as seen in c and bquark decays, i.e. the fractional energy loss of top quarks as they hadronize is small. Therefore, itwill be quite challenging to observe top quark fragmentation experimentally, even at the LHC.

Within the constraints discussed above we can assume that top quarks are produced and decaylike free quarks. The angular distribution of their decay products follow spin 1

2 predictions. Theangular distribution of W bosons from top decays is propagated to its decay products. In case ofleptonic W decays the polarization is preserved and can be measured [142]. The angular distributionof charged leptons from W decays originating from top quarks is given by

1

Γ

d cos θℓ=

3

4

M2top sin

2 θℓ +M2W (1 − cos θℓ)

2

M2top + 2M2

W

(25)

where π − θℓ is the angle between the b quark direction and the charged lepton in the W boson restframe [143].

4. Experimental techniques

Advanced experimental techniques are needed to detect and reconstruct top quark events in hadroniccollisions. Large scale general-purpose detectors are employed for that task, their overall structure isquite similar. Early searches for the top quark were conducted with the UA1 and UA2 experiments atthe CERN SppS. The detectors CDF and DØ are currently in operation at the Fermilab Tevatron andwe will discuss those as typical examples of collider detectors in more detail in sections 4.2 and 4.3,respectively. In the future the LHC will also feature two general-purpose experiments, CMS andATLAS, which are currently under construction at CERN.

Usually, general purpose collider detectors feature rotational symmetry with respect to thenominal beam axis and forward-backward symmetry with respect to the nominal interaction point inthe centre of the detector. Therefore, a right-handed coordinate system is chosen such that the originis at the centre of the detector and the z-axis points along the symmetry axis parallel to the beam(in case of the Tevatron the proton beam). The x- and y-axes define the transverse plane, the y-axispoints vertically upwards. It is often practical to replace the x and y coordinates by the azimuth angleφ = arctan(y/x), measured in the transverse plane with respect to the x-axis, and the polar angle θ,measured with respect to the z-axis (θ = 0). φ takes values from 0 to 2π, θ from 0 to π. Instead of θ itis often handy to use the pseudorapidity η, which is defined as η = − ln(tan θ/2). For massless particlesη is equal to the rapidity y = 1/2 ln((E + pz)/(E − pz)), which is an important quantity because therapidity difference ∆y between two particles is Lorentz-invariant. It is also common to calculate theangle between two particles in terms of the distance in the η-φ plane: ∆R ≡

∆η2 +∆φ2. Table 5gives a summary on the definition of kinematic variables.

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 29

Table 5. Summary of the definition of kinematic variables.

invariant mass m2 = pµpµ = E2 − ~p 2

tranverse momentum p2t = p2x + p2y

transverse mass m2t ≡ m2 + p2t = E2 − p2z = (E + pz) · (E − pz)

rapidity y ≡ 12 ln

(

E+pz

E−pz

)

= ln(

E+pz

mt

)

pseudo-rapidity η ≡ − ln(

tan θ2

)

distance in the η − φ plane ∆R ≡√

∆η2 +∆φ2

4.1. The Tevatron Collider

As most of the knowledge about the top quark was obtained from measurements of pp collisionsat the Tevatron we briefly discuss this accelerator here. The Tevatron is located at the FermiNational Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) near Chicago. In order to reach energies of 980 GeVper beam, a system of several accelerators is needed. In the first stage of acceleration, a co*ckcroft-Walton pre-accelerator is used to generate negatively charged hydrogen ions out of hydrogen gas andthen accelerate them via electric fields up to an energy of 750 keV. Afterwards, the ions enter anapproximately 150 m long linear accelerator, where they are accelerated up to 400 MeV by oscillatingelectric fields. Before leaving this acceleration stage, the ions pass through a carbon foil, which removestheir negative charges (electrons). As a result one obtains a beam of protons that is subsequentlybent in a circular path by the magnets of a circular accelerator, called the booster. On its way out ofthe booster, the beam has an energy of 8 GeV. In the next stage, the protons enter the Main Injector,a multitask accelerator completed in 1999. This machine accelerates protons up to 150 GeV. Someprotons are accelerated to 120 GeV and used for antiproton production. They are forced to collidewith a nickel target, which is installed at the antiproton source facility. The interactions with thetarget produce a variety of particles, among them many antiprotons, which are being collected, focusedand finally stored in the Accumulator Ring. As soon as a sufficient number of antiprotons has beenproduced, they are sent to the Main Injector, which accelerates them up to an energy of 150 GeV. Inthe final stage, the proton and antiproton beams with 150 GeV energy are injected in the Tevatron,a circular accelerator with a circumference of about 6 km, which is the most powerful operationalhadron accelerator worldwide. Each beam is accelerated to an energy of 0.98 TeV which is equal to(anti-)protons reaching velocities of 0.9999995 times the speed of light. These beams are forced tocollide with each other at two interaction regions, producing a centre of mass energy of

√s = 1.96 TeV.

The general purpose experiments CDF and DØ are placed at these collision points. The performanceof a collider is described with a quantity called luminosity, L. The event rate for a certain processwith cross section σ is given by the product N = σ ·L. For a certain time interval the number of eventsproduced by this process is given by N = σ ·

Ldt, where∫

Ldt is the integrated luminosity. Thepeak luminosity is reached at the begin of a store after protons and antiprotons have been injected.Over the period of a store the luminosity slowly decreases as collisions and beam gas interactions leadto a lowering of beam currents, that is a loss of protons and antiprotons stored in the Tevatron. Themaximum value of luminosity that has been achieved until May 2005 is 13.0·1031cm−2s−1, which isabout 60% above the design value of 8·1031cm−2s−1.

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 30

Figure 14. Elevation view of one half of the CDF II detector.

4.2. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF)

CDF is in operation since 1987. The first Tevatron run (Run I) lasted until 1995, when a substantialupgrade program of the accelerator complex and the collider detectors began. The installation ofthe renewed experiment finished in 2001 and after a commissioning period of about 1 year CDF IIis taking physics quality data. Run II is expected to last until 2009 and accumulate an integratedluminosity corresponding to 4.4 – 8.5 fb−1 [144]. Although we include physics results obtained in RunI, we describe CDF in its upgraded form after 2001 (CDF II), see reference [145] for a brief overview.A detailed description of the Run I detector can be found elsewhere [146, 147]. Figure 14 shows anelevation view of one half of the CDF II detector.

Tracking System In CDF II particle collisions take place within a luminous region which isapproximately described by a Gaussian distribution with a width of 30 cm. The inner part of CDFII is dedicated to reconstruct the trajectories of charged particles and measure their momenta. Theentire tracking volume is immersed into a solenoidal magnetic field of | ~B| = 1.4T. The transversemomentum pT of charged particles is measured by determining the curvature of their trajectories in themagnetic field. The tracking system has two major components, the central drift chamber (COT) [148]and the silicon tracker that itself is composed of three subsystems: Layer 00, the SVX II [149] and

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 31

the Intermediate Silicon Layers (ISL) [150]. Layer 00 consists of one layer of radiation-tolerant single-sided silicon strip detectors which are directly glued onto the beam pipe. SVX II extends radially fromr1 = 2.4 cm to r2 = 10.7 cm, it is 96 cm long and provides full angular coverage in the pseudorapidityregion of |η| ≤ 2.0. The SVX II is segmented in three cylindrical barrels with beryllium bulkheadsat each end for mechanical support, cooling the modules and facilitating the readout. The SVX IIfeatures five layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors which provide measurements in the r-φ andr-z views. The ISL consists of one layer of double-sided strip detectors in the central region, |η| ≤ 1.0,and two layers in the forward and backward regions. The central ISL is located at a radius of 22 cmand allows to robustly link tracks between the SVX II and the central drift chamber (COT). The COTis a cylindrical open-cell drift chamber with inner and outer radii of 40 and 137 cm. It is designedto find charged particles in the pseudorapidity region of |η| ≤ 1.0 with transverse momenta as lowas 400 MeV/c. Four axial and four stereo super-layers with 12 sense wires each provide a total of96 measurements. The drift gas is a 50:50 Argon-Ethane admixture and the drift field is 1.9 kV/cm,yielding a maximum drift time of 180 ns. When combining measurements in the silicon tracker andthe COT the momentum resolution for charged particles is δpT /p

2T < 0.17%GeV−1 c.

Between the COT and the solenoid a Time-of-Flight (TOF) system has been installed to improveparticle identification [151]. The TOF consists of scintillation panels which provide both timing andamplitude information. The main purpose of the TOF system is to distinguish between charged pionsand kaons with momenta p < 1.6 GeV/c, which is important to reconstruct clean samples of exclusiveb hadron decays and to tag the flavor of b hadrons in CP violation and oscillation measurements.

Calorimetry The solenoid of CDF is surrounded by calorimeters, where measurements of theelectromagnetic and hadronic showers are performed. The calorimeters are segmented in azimuthand in pseudorapidity to form a projective tower geometry which points back to the nominalinteraction point. In addition, the calorimeters are segmented longitudinally to distinguish betweenelectromagnetic (EM) and hadronic (HAD) showers. All CDF calorimeter systems are samplingcalorimeters consisting of a sandwich of absorber (lead or iron) and scintillator material. Theinner part of the calorimeters is used to measure and identify electromagnetic showers. The centralelectromagnetic calorimeter is called CEM [152], the forward (plug) part PEM [153]. To improve thespacial resolution a layer of proportional wire chambers is located at the shower maximum in theelectromagnetic calorimeter. Additional proportional chambers located between the solenoid and theCEM sample the early development of electromagnetic showers in the magnet. The outer parts of thecalorimeters measure hadronic showers. There are three hadron calorimeter subsystems: the central(CHA) [154], the wall (WHA) and the plug (PHA) calorimeter. Table 6 summarises information onCDF calorimetry including the coverage in pseudorapidity, the radiation thickness and the energyresolution.

Muon System In general, high-pT muons can traverse the calorimeter loosing only a small fractionof their energy due to ionization. They act as minimum ionizing particles. Most hadrons, on theother hand, interact strongly within the calorimeter volume and produce hadronic showers. This effectallows to identify muons by placing additional scintillation counters and wire chambers surrounding thecalorimeter. The CDF muon identification system is composed out of four subdetectors: the CentralMuon Detection System (CMU) [155], the Central Muon Upgrade (CMP), the Central Muon Extension(CMX) and the Intermediate Muon System (IMU). The muon system covers the pseudorapidity regionof |η| < 1.5. To reach the muon system the muons must have a minimum transverse momentum of1.4 GeV/c.

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Table 6. Summary of CDF calorimeter properties in Run II. The energy resolutions for theelectromagnetic calorimeters are for incident electrons and photons; in case of the hadron calorimeterfor incident isolated pions. The ⊕ signifies that the constant term is added in quadrature. Thetransverse energy ET and the energy E are measured in units of GeV.

System Pseudorapidity Thickness Energy Resolution

CEM |η| < 1.1 19 X0, 1 λ 13.5%/√ET ⊕ 2%

PEM 1.1 < |η| < 3.64 21 X0, 1 λ 16%/√E⊕ 1%

CHA |η| < 0.9 4.5 λ 75%/√ET ⊕ 3%

WHA 0.7 < |η| < 1.3 4.5 λ 75%/√E⊕ 4%

PHA 1.1 < |η| < 3.64 7 λ 74%/√E⊕ 4%

Trigger and Data Acquisition The CDF trigger and data acquisition system features three distinctlevels. Level 1 is implemented in customized hardware, it uses input from the muon system, thecalorimeters and COT tracks reconstructed by the extra-fast tracker (XFT). The maximum acceptrate (i.e. output rate) of Level 1 is 50 kHz. Level 2 is a software trigger implemented on an Alphaprocessor. It allows to identify physics objects like electrons, photons, muons and jets. In addition, itis possible to select events with tracks which have large impact parameter; a feature which resemblesa revolution in enriching samples for bottom- and charm-physics at hadron colliders. The maximumoutput rate of Level 2 is approximately 300 Hz. The highest trigger level, Level 3, runs part of theoffline reconstruction code on a PC farm and classifies events in different data streams. The outputrate to permanent storage is about 75 Hz. In most analyses top quark events are selected by requiringa high-pT muon or electron. The respective triggers are quite simple and have high trigger efficienciesbetween 95 and 100%.

Luminosity Measurement An important set of measurements at a hadron collider is to determine thecross sections for the production of heavy particles, such as b quarks, top quarks or W and Z bosons.To accomplish these measurements it is crucial to know the integrated luminosity of a given data setwith good precision. At CDF the luminosity measurement is performed by Cherenkov LuminosityCounters (CLC) [156]. The detector consists of long conical, gaseous Cherenkov counters that areinstalled at small polar angles in the proton and antiproton directions and point to the collisionregion. The Cherenkov counters measure the number of particles in the CLC acceptance as well astheir arrival time for each bunch crossing.

The number of pp interactions per bunch crossing follows a Poisson distribution with mean µ.The probability of empty crossings is given by P(0) = e−µ. By measuring the fraction of emptycrossings with the CLC the average µ is determined [145]. The instantaneous luminosity is then givenby L = f ·µ/σinel, where f is the average bunch-crossing frequency and σinel the total inelastic pp crosssection. At the Tevatron in Run II we have f = 1.7MHz. To avoid a trigger bias the events for theluminosity measurement are taken with a random beam-crossing trigger (zero bias trigger) runningat approximately 1 Hz. The luminosity measurement has a systematic uncertainty of 6% mainly dueto the uncertainty on the total inelastic cross section and the acceptance of the CLC.

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PDTs

ShieldingCalorimeter

MDTs

Scintillation Counters

ToroidTracking Detectors

µ−

µ−

µ−

Figure 15. One quadrant of the DØ detector.

4.3. The DØ Experiment

The DØ detector is a large general purpose detector primarily designed to study high mass statesand large transverse momentum phenomena. The detector design was optimised with respect tothree general goals: (1) excellent identification and measurement of electrons and muons, (2) goodmeasurement of parton jets at large pT and (3) a well-controlled measure of missing transverse energy(ET/ ) as a sign of the presence of neutrinos. Figure 15 shows one quadrant of the DØ detector. In thefollowing paragraphs we discuss the subsystems of DØ in more details.

Tracking System The inner tracking system comprises two major subsystems: a high precision siliconmicrostrip tracker (SMT) [157] and a scintillating fibre tracker [158]. The inner tracker is encased in asuperconducting solenoid, which provides a magnetic field of 2 Tesla. The SMT consists of six barrelmodules and 16 disk modules. Each barrel module has four radial layers of strip detector ladderswhich are arranged parallel to the beam axis. The layers are evenly spaced between radii of 2.5 and10 cm. Single- and double-sided detectors provide measurements in the r-φ and the r-z views. Layers2 and 4 feature double-sided detectors which have axial strips on each side with a small stereo angle of2◦ between the views. There is one disk module with 12 wedge shaped double-sided detectors at oneend of each barrel. These disks are called F-disks. The silicon wafers on a disk module are orientedperpendicular to the beam axis and allow tracking at high pseudo-rapidities. At each end of thebarrel assembly there are additional three F-disk modules. Thus, there is 12 F-disk modules in total.Further along the beam pipe, on each side of the detector, there are two larger disks of single-sidedstrip detectors (H-disks).

The Central Fibre Tracker (CFT) consists of scintillating fibres mounted on eight concentriccylinders which extend radially from 19.5 cm to 51.5 cm. The detector is divided into 80 sectors inazimuth. Each sector contains 896 fibres, resulting in a total of 71680 channels. The CFT providesfull angular coverage of the central region up to |η| < 1.7. Charged particles passing through a fibreproduce scintillation light that will travel along the fibre in both directions. At one end, an aluminiummirror reflects the light back into the fibre. At the other end, the fibre is joined to a wavelengthshifting waveguide that transmits the light to silicon avalanche photodiodes, which convert the light

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into an electrical signal. The momentum resolution of the DØ tracking system can be parametrizedby ∆pT /pT =

0.0152 + (0.0014 pT )2, where pT is measured in GeV.

Calorimetry DØ has a sampling calorimeter based on depleted uranium, lead and copper as absorbermaterials and liquid argon as sampling medium. The calorimeter consists of three cryostats: the CentreCalorimeter (CC), which covers the pseudorapidity region of |η| < 1.2 and two endcap calorimeters(EC) which extend up to |η| ≈ 4. The electromagnetic section of the calorimeter has a thicknessof approximately 20 radiation lengths X0. Calorimeter cells in the central region have a size of∆η × ∆φ = 0.1 × 0.1, except for the third layer of the electromagnetic section, where the grid sizeis ∆η × ∆φ = 0.05 × 0.05 to provide better spacial resolution in the maximum of electromagneticshowers. At η = 0, the CC has a total of 7.2 nuclear interaction lengths (λ), at the smallest angle ofthe EC the total is 10.3λ. The energy resolution of the calorimeter is ∆E/E = 15%/

√E ⊕ 0.4% for

electrons and photons. For charged pions and jets the energy resolution is 50%/√E and 80%/

√E,

respectively (E is measured in GeV).To improve electron identification DØ features a preshower detector which consists of two

subsystems: the central system covering the region with |η| < 1.3 (CPS) and the forward systemscovering 1.5 < |η| < 2.5 (FPS) [159]. Both subdetectors are based on a combination of lead radiatorand scintillator layers. Electrons and photons shower in the radiator, while muons or charged pionsonly deposit energy due to ionization. In the central region the lead is mounted on the outer surfaceof the solenoid amounting to a total of 2X0. The scintillator is placed between the lead layer and thecalorimeter. In the forward region, which is not fully covered by the tracking system, the radiatoris sandwiched between two scintillator layers. Photons do not deposit energy in the first scintillatorlayer and can thereby be distinguished from electrons.

Muon System The muon detector of DØ consists of three major components: (1) a toroid

magnet which provides a magnetic field of | ~B| = 1.8 T, (2) the Wide Angle Muon Spectrometer(WAMUS) [160] covering the central region of |η| < 1.0, and (3) the Forward Angle Muon Spectrometer(FAMUS) covering the area of 1.0 < |η| < 2.0 [161]. Both spectrometers are based on layers ofproportional drift tubes and scintillation counters. Being immersed in a magnetic field allows themuon system to provide a momentum measurement for muons independent of the inner tracker. Thisfeature of DØ is a major difference to CDF where the muon momentum is determined by matchinga muon stub to a track in the central tracker. The total amount of material in the calorimeter andthe iron toroids varies between 13 and 19 nuclear interaction lengths, making the background fromhadronic punch-through negligible.

Trigger and Data Acquisition DØ has a three-tier system of triggers to select events for recording.The Level 1 trigger is a hardware based system with an output rate of 10 kHz [162]. Data comingfrom the preshower detector and the fibre tracker (CFT) are combined to form the Central TrackTrigger (CTT) [163]. In addition, there are conventional calorimeter and muon triggers. Level 2 ofthe trigger system delivers an output rate to 1 kHz [164]. At the second trigger level information of alldetector components can be combined at improved resolutions. Level 3, running high level softwarealgorithms on a PC farm, further reduces the rate to 50 Hz.

Luminosity Measurement At DØ the luminosity is measured by two hodoscopes located on the insideface of the calorimeters [165]. Each of these hodoscopes is made of 24 wedge shaped scintillators withfine mesh photo-multiplier tubes mounted on the face of each wedge. The hodoscopes cover thepseudorapidity region of 2.7 < |η| < 4.4. The luminosity counters are designed to distinguish betweensingle and multiple interaction events. The measurement of the rate of single inelastic interaction

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events is used to deduce the Poisson mean µ of the number of interactions per bunch-crossing. Theinstantaneous luminosity is then calculated by using L = f · µ/σinel as discussed in Sec. 4.2. Theluminosity measurement has an uncertainty of 7%.

4.4. Top quark signatures in tt events

In this section we discuss the experimental signature of top quark events. We constrain the discussionto the decay mode which dominates in the SM: t → W + b with a branching ratio close to 100%.We further concentrate on the signatures of tt events, since pair production is the main source oftop quarks at the Tevatron and at the LHC. The signature of single top quark events and top quarkdecays via flavour changing neutral currents are presented in chapters 8.6 and 9.

Once both top quarks have decayed, a tt event contains two W bosons and two b quarks:W+W−bb. Experimentally, tt events are classified according to the decay modes of the W bosons.There are three leptonic modes (eνe, µνµ, τντ ) and six decay modes into quarks of different flavour(ud, us, ub, cd, cs, cb). We distinguish four tt event categories:

(i) Both W bosons decay into light leptons (either eνe or µνµ) which can be directly seen in thedetector. This category is called dilepton channel.

(ii) One W boson decays into eνe or µνµ. The second W decays into quarks. This channel is calledlepton-plus-jets.

(iii) Both W bosons decay into quarks. We refer to this mode as the all hadronic channel.

(iv) At least one W boson decays into a tau lepton (τντ ) which itself can decay either leptonically(into eνe or µνµ) or hadronically into quarks.

In good approximation we can neglect all lepton masses with respect to the W mass and write:

Γ0W ≡ Γ(W → eνe) = Γ(W → µνµ) = Γ(W → τντ )

At lowest order in perturbation theory the decay rate into a quark-antiquark pair, q1q2, is given bythe rate into leptons Γ0

W multiplied by the square of the CKM matrix element |Vq1q2 |2 and enhancedby a colour factor of 3, which takes into account that quarks come in three different colours:

Γ(W → q1q2) = 3 |Vq1q2 |2 Γ0W .

The hadronic decay width Γhad of the W is summed over all six quark-antiquark modes

Γhad = 3Γ0W ·

q1q2

|Vq1q2 |2 with q1q2 ∈ {ud, us, ub, cd, cs, cb}.

The unitarity of the CKM matrix demands that the sum over the CKM elements squared is equal to2 and one obtains Γhad = 6Γ0

W . As a result, each leptonic channel has a branching ratio of 1/9, whilethe hadronic decay channel into two quarks has a branching ratio of 6/9. For the tt decay categorieswe get thus the probabilities as listed in Tab. 7. (i) Dilepton mode: 4/81, (ii) lepton-plus-jets: 24/81,(iii) all-hadronic channel: 36/81, (iv) tau modes: 17/81. These four different types of tt events canbe isolated by their distinct event topologies.

Dilepton Channel This final state includes (1) two high pT leptons, electron or muon, (2) a largeimbalance in the total transverse momentum (missing transverse energy, ET/ ) due to two neutrinos,and (3) two b quark jets. The dilepton event category has low backgrounds, especially in the eµchannel, since Z0 mediated events do not contribute. However, the drawback of the dilepton channelis its low branching ratio of about 5%. There is a small contribution from tau events to the dileptonchannel, if the tau decays into e or µ. This cross feed has to be taken into account when calculatingacceptances for dilepton analyses. Since dilepton events contain two neutrinos which contribute to the

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Table 7. Categories of tt events and their branching fractions.

W decays e/µν τν qq

e/µν 4/81 4/81 24/81

τν – 1/81 12/81

qq – – 36/81

Muon Pt = 37 GeVMissing Et = 45 GeVRun 178855

Event 5504617Number of Jets = 4

Tagged Jet 1: Et = 111 GeV, Phi = 79, L2d = 7 mm Tagged Jet 2: Et = 38 GeV, Phi = 355, L2d = 1 mm

Figure 16. Event display of a CDF II muon-plus-jets event. The isolated line on the left hand sideshows the muon trajectory. The arrow on the lower right indicated the direction of the ET/ . Theevent features four hadronic jets.

ET/ , the top quarks cannot be fully reconstructed. This is a drawback if one wants to measure the topquark mass. However, this disadvantage is partially compensated by the precisely measured leptonmomenta, in contrast to the only fair measurement of jet energies in the lepton-plus-jets channel.

Lepton-Plus-Jets Channel The lepton-plus-jets channel is characterised by (1) exactly one high-pTelectron or muon, which is also called the primary lepton, (2) missing transverse energy, (3) two bquark jets from the top decays, and (4) two additional jets from one W decay. An event display of alepton-plus-jets candidate event measured at CDF II is shown in figure 16. The big advantage of thelepton-plus-jets channel is its high branching fraction of about 30%. The backgrounds are considerablyhigher than in the dilepton channel, but still manageable. Several strategies of background suppressionhave been developed and are discussed in section 6.2. Again, as in the dilepton channel, there is somecross feed from tau modes which has to be taken into account for acceptances. In lepton-plus-jets eventsthe momentum of the leptonically decayingW boson can be reconstructed up to a twofold ambiguity.The transverse momentum of the neutrino is assumed to be given by ET/ . Two solutions for the zcomponent of the neutrino are obtained from the requirement that the reconstructed invariant massof the lepton and the neutrino be equal to the well known W mass: Mℓν =MW . To fully reconstruct

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the momenta of the top and antitop quark in the event, one has to assign the measured hadronic jetsto the quarks. Without identification of b quark jets there are 24 possible combinations, including theambiguity of the neutrino reconstruction. If one jet is identified as likely to originate from a b quark12 combinations remain. If there are two identified b jets the ambiguity is down to 4 options. Thisillustrates the importance of b quark jet identification for top quark physics.

All Hadronic Channel The all hadronic channel has the largest branching ratio out of all ttevent categories, about 44%. However, backgrounds are quite considerable. While there is theadvantage that all final state partons are measured, one has to deal with numerous combinationswhen reconstructing the top quark momenta. Even if two jets are identified as b quark jets, 12possible combinations remain. Another drawback is that jet energies as measured in the calorimeterhave large uncertainties. The combination of these disadvantages leads to the conclusion that the allhadronic channel, even though a clear tt signal has been established here, proves not very useful tofurther investigate top quark properties.

Tau Modes Top quark events containing the decay W → τντ are difficult to identify and have notbeen seen to date. The search for this decay mode is briefly described in section 8.3.

4.5. Particle detection and identification

In the previous section we have explained tt signatures in terms of primary partons. In this sectionwe will discuss how these partons are detected and how their properties are measured.

4.5.1. Electrons and muons Charged leptons emerging from a decay of a W boson have hightransverse momenta that can be measured by the tracking system with good resolution. Electronsinteract within the first few segments of the calorimeter and form electromagnetic showers of photonsand electron-positron pairs. To select electrons from W decays one typically requires a transverseenergy, ET = E · sin θ, of at least 20 GeV. The energy resolution (at CDF for example) isσ(ET )/ET = 13.5%/

√ET ⊕ 2%, where ET is measured in GeV. The shower should be mainly

contained in the electromagnetic part of the calorimeter. A typical requirement is that 90% of thetotal measured energy is observed in the electromagnetic calorimeter. Moreover, there must be atrack that, if extrapolated to the calorimeter, matches the location of the electromagnetic shower andhas a momentum consistent with the shower energy (E/p ∼ 1). Additional requirements include thetransverse and longitudinal shapes of the shower, which are known from test beam data. Energeticphotons that interact with detector material prior to their entry into the tracking system and producean electron-positron pair can mimic high-pT primary electrons and pose a serious background. One canidentify and veto these conversion pairs if both, the electron and the positron track, are reconstructedand fulfil a matching criterion with respect to a common vertex. The major background to high-pTelectrons arises from hadronic showers developing early in the calorimeter and depositing most of theirenergy in the electromagnetic section. Such a case can, e.g., be caused by photons from π0 decays. Thehadronic jet background can be considerably suppressed by exploiting the fact that leptons comingfrom a heavy boson decay are isolated from other jet activity in the event. Thus, it is asked that theelectron shower is isolated from other energy deposits in the calorimeter. A typical requirement isthat the energy measured in an annulus of radius ∆R = 0.4 around the electron shower is less than10% of the shower energy.

Muons can be reliably identified as tracks that penetrate the calorimeter as well as additionalshielding material and reach the outmost layers of the collider experiment, the muon system.The track is typically required to have a transverse momentum of at least 20 GeV/c and match,when extrapolated through the calorimeter, a short track segment measured in the muon system.

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Uncertainties due to multiple scattering in the calorimeter and the shielding material have to beconsidered accordingly in the matching criteria. The transverse momentum of high-pT muons ismeasured with a typical resolution of σ(pT )/pT = 0.1% pT , where pT is given in GeV/c. Theenergy measured in the calorimeter segment containing the muon is required to be consistent withthe deposition expected from a minimum ionizing particle. Muons are required to be isolated fromadditional calorimeter activity as described above for electrons. Real muons from cosmic rays have tobe distinguished from muons originating from hadronic collisions and removed from the data sample.One requires that the muon track extrapolates to the primary collision point of the event. Timinginformation of the tracker and the calorimeter are used to ensure that the passage of the muonthrough the primary interaction region falls into a narrow time window around the beam crossing,that is known from the accelerator clock signal. Other backgrounds to the muon signal arise frompion or kaon decays in flight, or from hadrons that traverse the calorimeter and the absorber materialwithout producing a hadronic shower (punch-through).

High-pT electrons and muons can be speedily reconstructed with good precision and are used inthe trigger systems of collider experiments to select events containing heavy gauge bosons and otherhigh-pT events in real time. The primary data samples for tt dilepton and lepton-plus-jets events aredefined in this way.

4.5.2. Neutrinos Neutrinos interact only weakly with matter and therefore cannot be directlyobserved in a collider detector. Instead their presence is inferred from an imbalance in the totaltransverse energy of the event. As described in section 3.1.1 the hard scattering in hadronic collisionshappens between two partons whose momentum fraction is a-priori unknown. The remnants of thecolliding hadrons, the spectator partons that do not participate in the hard interaction, have littletransverse momentum and escape undetected down the beam pipe. In contrast to e+e− collisions onecan therefore not simply invoke energy and momentum conservation before and after the collisions.However, the total transverse momentum is conserved and is known to be zero before the collision.Any imbalance in the vector sum of transverse momenta can therefore be attributed to the presence ofneutrinos that carry away momentum undetected. In practice, one cannot determine the momenta ofall particles produced in the collision, but rather measures the imbalance of energy in the calorimeter.To each calorimeter cell i one assigns a transverse energy vector Ei

T = (Ei sin θi cosφi, Ei sin θi sinφi)and calculates the sum over all cells: ET/ = −

i EiT. Here θi and φi are the angular coordinates

of calorimeter cell i. Since muons loose only a minimal amount of their energy in the calorimeter,ET/ has to be corrected for identified muons. The limiting factor on the resolution of ET/ = |ET/ |is the uncertainty in the measurement of hadronic jet energies in the calorimeter. Therefore, oneusually parametrizes the ET/ resolution in terms of the scalar sum of all transverse energies in theevent,

ET, measured in GeV. For tt dilepton candidate events CDF has measured a resolution ofσ(ET/ ) = 0.7 ·

√∑

ET [166]. DØ determined its ET/ resolution for minimum bias data and quotesσ(ET/ ) = 1.08 GeV + 0.019

ET [167].

4.5.3. Jets of quarks and gluons The strength of the strong force increases with distance and preventselementary particles carrying colour charge, i.e. quarks and gluons, from existing as free objects.Quarks and gluons are confined to exist in hadrons, which are colour singlets. In collider experimentsquarks and gluons participate in the hard interaction and subsequently form collimated jets of hadronswhich can be observed in a detector. Jets tend to preserve the direction of motion of the original parton.In the calorimeter they are detected as an extended cluster of energy. To compare measurements withtheoretical predictions a precise mathematical prescription is necessary how to form jets out of energyclusters measured in the calorimeter. Different jet algorithms are available, but at hadron colliderscalorimeter cells are conventionally combined within a cone of fixed radius ∆R in η-φ space, because

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jets are approximately circular in the η-φ plane. Moreover, in this parametrization the size of a jet ofa particular ET is independent of the jet rapidity. The cone size ∆R is chosen differently dependingon the physics analysis. On one hand the cone must be big enough, such that most of the energyassociated to the original quark is contained in the jet cone. On the other hand the cone size shouldbe small enough, such that energy depositions corresponding to different primary partons are resolvedindividually rather than merged to one jet. This is especially a concern for tt events which have manyjets in their final state. At the Tevatron the optimal choice was found to be ∆R = 0.4 for CDF and∆R = 0.5 for DØ. The difference between the two experiments reflects a small dependence on thecalorimeter design and geometry.

Both Tevatron experiments feature an energy resolution for jets of σ(ET)/ET ≈ 100%/√ET,

where ET is measured in GeV. Several systematic effects compromise the jet energy measurement:(1) intrinsic large fluctuations in the response of calorimeters to hadronic showers, (2) nonlinear effectsin calorimeter response, (3) calorimeter non-uniformities and energy loss in uninstrumented regions,such as cracks between modules, (4) increase in energy due to the overlap of multiple hard interactionsin one bunch crossing, (5) energy of the underlying event feeding into the jet cone (The underlyingevent consists of particles coming from the fragmentation of partons that do not participate in thehard scattering of the primary pp or pp interaction.), and (6) energy loss due to the use of a finite conesize in jet reconstruction. To understand these effects experimentally turns out to be one of the majorchallenges in collider physics. Appropriate correction methods have to be derived and the detectorsimulation has to be tuned to describe the measurements.

Calorimeter calibration commonly starts with the electromagnetic section for which an absoluteenergy scale can be derived by comparing electron energies measured in the calorimeter to theirmomenta measured in the tracking system or by reconstructing resonances with well known massessuch as the Z boson, the π0 or the J/ψ. In a second step the hadronic part of the calorimetercan be calibrated against the electromagnetic part by studying photon-plus-one-jet events, where thetransverse energies should balance. Dijet events are further used to calibrate one hadronic region ofthe detector relative to another better understood region. Contributions from the underlying event areinvestigated by Monte Carlo simulations and comparison to data taken under special trigger conditionsand luminosities.

Finally, it has to be noted that one cannot achieve a one-to-one correspondence of primary quarksand gluons and the observed jets in all kinematic regions and for all event topologies of a certainphysics process, and one cannot expect to do so. To define jets a minimum of transverse energy isrequired. One may start counting soft jets with 8GeV. However, this can complicate discriminationbetween signal and background. In most tt analyses jets are typically defined with ET > 15GeV.This threshold causes, e.g., some tt lepton-plus-jets events to have only three instead of four jets.Another source of inefficiency in jet reconstruction is the merging of jets which are close togetherin η-φ space and cannot be resolved separately. Conversely, if a parton radiates a gluon with largerelative transverse momentum, that gluon can be reconstructed as an additional jet.

4.5.4. Tagging of b quark jets As pointed out in section 4.4, tt events feature two energetic bquark jets, while the heavy flavour content in background events is relatively low. Therefore, theidentification, also called the tagging, of b quark jets is an important tool to suppress background,enrich top quark data samples, and to facilitate the full reconstruction of top quark momenta byreducing the number of possible combinations of final state objects. In this section we briefly presentthree b tagging methods employed at hadron colliders. The first two methods are based on therelatively long lifetime of b hadrons, which is about 1.5 ps. Since b hadrons emerging from top quarkdecays have relatively high momenta, their long lifetime allows them to travel several mm beforedecaying. Tracks from a b hadron decay therefore typically originate from a secondary vertex that isdisplaced from the primary interaction point. The first b tagging method reconstructs the secondary

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vertex of b hadrons within a jet and bases the b tag on the significance of the displacement. Thesecond method searches for tracks with large impact parameter with respect to the primary vertex,but does not require the reconstruction of the secondary vertex itself. The third method identifiesleptons at intermediate momenta (typically: 2GeV/c < pT < 20GeV/c) from semileptonic b decayswithin jets. Since momenta of these leptons are much smaller than those of leptons coming from Wor Z boson decays, this method is also called soft lepton tag.

Secondary vertex tag The secondary vertex method identifies b jets by establishing a displacedsecondary vertex in the jet from the decay of a long lived b hadron. The following explanationgoes along the lines of the algorithm employed by CDF, but the DØ version is quite similar. In afirst step the space point of the hard primary interaction is precisely reconstructed. One starts byclustering the z coordinates of all tracks at the point of their closest approach to the origin (perigee).After applying several quality requirements this procedure yields an estimate of the z position of theprimary vertex, zpv. The trajectory of the proton and antiproton beams through the collision region,also called the beamline, is known with high precision, O(1µm), from subsidiary measurements madeon a run-by-run basis. Combining zpv with the beamline yields a first estimate of the primary vertexposition xpv. The precision of xpv is subsequently improved by including tracks with low impactparameter significance into a full vertex fit. As a result, the uncertainty on the transverse position ofthe primary vertex ranges from about 10 – 30µm, depending on the number of tracks and the eventtopology.

The subsequent steps of secondary vertex tagging are performed on a per-jet basis. Only trackswithin the jet cone are considered. To ensure good track quality cuts involving the transversemomentum, the significance of their impact parameter d relative to xpv, d/σd, the number of siliconhits attached to a track, the quality of those hits, and the quality of the final track fit are applied.Tracks consistent with coming from the decays K0

s → π+π− or Λ → π−p, or photon conversions arenot accepted as good candidate tracks. For a jet to be taggable at least two good tracks have to fallwithin the jet cone. One iterates over the set of good tracks and tries to fit them to a common vertexwith a certain minimum fit quality (χ2 per degree of freedom).

Once a secondary vertex is found in a jet, the two-dimensional decay length L2D of the secondaryvertex is calculated. L2D is the projection of the vector pointing from the primary to the secondaryvertex onto the jet axis in the xy plane. The sign of L2D is determined by the angle between the jet axisand the secondary vertex vector in the xy plane. If the angle is < 90◦ the sign is positive, if the angle is> 90◦, the sign is negative. Large positive values of L2D are predominantly attached to vertices of realb hadron decays, while displaced vertices with negative L2D are mainly due to track mismeasurementsor random combinations of tracks. To reduce the background from false secondary vertices, calledmistags, a good secondary vertex is required to have a minimum decay length significance of typicallyL2D/σ2D > 3, where σ2D is the estimated uncertainty on L2D. The uncertainty σ2D is estimated foreach vertex individually, a typical value is about 200µm. Figure 17a shows the distribution of L2D asobtained in a CDF measurement of the tt cross section [168]. The distribution has the form of a fallingexponential, as expected from a lifetime distribution. The content of the first bin is exceptionally lowerdue to the cut on the decay length significance, L2D/σ2D > 3. More detailed descriptions of secondaryvertex b tagging can be found in references [166, 103] (CDF Run I), reference [168] (CDF Run II) andreferences [169, 170] (DØ Run II). In the latest CDF analysis (Run II) the efficiency of tagging atleast one b quark jet in a tt event is (53±3)% [168]. This number includes the geometric acceptanceof tracks from b decays (taggability). The estimated uncertainty is purely systematic.

Impact parameter tag The impact parameter b tag algorithm compares track impact parameters tomeasured resolution functions in order to calculate for each jet the probability that there are no long

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(a) (b)

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acks

/0.5

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Figure 17. (a) Two-dimensional decay length L2D of secondary vertices as obtained in a CDFmeasurement of the tt cross section [168]. (b) Distribution of the signed impact parameter significanceof tracks in a jet data sample, where there is at least one jet with ET > 50GeV per event. Thedata are fit with a resolution function consisting of two Gaussians plus an exponential function,separately for the positive and negative sides [103].

lived particles in the jet cone. For light quark or gluon jets this probability is uniformly distributedbetween 0 and 1, while it is very small for jets containing tracks from displaced vertices of heavy flavourdecays. The impact parameter significance S0 is defined as the ratio of the impact parameter d and itsuncertainty σd. The sign of d is defined to be positive if the point of closest approach to the primaryvertex lies in the same hemisphere as the jet direction, and negative otherwise. Figure 17b showsthe S0 distribution of tracks in a jet data sample. The distribution is fit with a resolution function.The negative side of the resolution function is used to compute the probability P (S0) that the S0 ofa particular track is due to detector resolution. The probability that a jet is consistent with a zerolifetime hypothesis is essentially given by the product of the individual probabilities P (S0) of trackscontained in the jet cone including an appropriate normalization. Tracks used in the calculationof the jet probability are required to satisfy certain quality criteria involving a cut on the impactparameter, the transverse momentum and the number of hits in the silicon detector. The impactparameter tagging method has the advantage of providing a continuous variable, the jet probability,to distinguish between light and heavy flavour jets, which easily allows it to choose a certain valueof b tagging efficiency by adjusting the cut value on the jet probability. In addition, the probabilityvalue can be used in subsequent steps of an analysis, e.g. when applying multivariate techniques.

Soft Lepton Tag The Soft Lepton Tag (SLT) is based on the identification of leptons originating fromsemileptonic b decays b → ℓ + X , where the lepton is either an electron or a muon. Contributionscome from the decay mode b→ cℓν or the sequential decay b→ c→ sℓν. The semileptonic branchingratio of b and c hadrons is measured to be about 10% per lepton species (e or µ) [10]. This meansthat about 80% of tt events have at least one lepton from a semileptonic decay. In contrast to leptonsfrom W decays the leptons from b decays are not isolated, but are rather contained in the cone ofthe b quark jet. Their pT spectrum is much softer, typically well below 20GeV/c. Therefore, thedetection and identification of these leptons is much more difficult. In Run II, DØ and CDF haveused only muons for the soft lepton tag so far. DØ selects muons in the transverse momentum range

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of 4GeV/c < pT < 15GeV/c and achieves a b jet tagging efficiency of 11% [170].

4.6. Generation and simulation of Monte Carlo events

Collider experiments are intricate devices and predicting the experimental response to a certain physicsprocess is non-trivial. To extract sensible information from data one needs first an accurate modellingof the event kinematics and topology on parton and hadron level, and second a detailed simulation ofthe detector response to particles interacting with the detector material.

There are two commonly used general purpose Monte Carlo event generators, Pythia [171]and Herwig [172], which provide an exclusive description of individual events at hadron level.They are based on leading order matrix elements for the hard parton scattering convoluted withparametrizations of parton distribution functions and include approximate treatments of higher orderperturbative effects, initial and final state gluon emission, parton shower, hadronization, secondarydecays and the underlying event. The strength of Pythia and Herwig is the modelling of the partonshower, where outgoing partons are converted into a cascade of gluons and qq pairs with energy andangular distributions determined by the DGLAP equations, which describe the Q2 evolution of quarkand gluon densities [173, 174, 175]. The parton shower is terminated when the virtual invariant massof the parton (Q2) falls below a threshold value chosen such that a perturbative treatment is validabove the threshold. The evolution of the shower beyond this stage is determined by non-perturbativephysics. The partons are turned into colourless hadrons according to phenomenological hadronization(or fragmentation) models. Particles originating from interactions of the beam remnants are alsoincluded in the model and are called the underlying event. A set of parameters is tuned to reproducehadron multiplicities and transverse momentum spectra of the underlying event as measured in softpp collisions, so called minimum bias events. To obtain a proper modelling of b and c hadron decays,heavy flavor jets are interfaced to the decay algorithm QQ which comprises tables of the most up todate branching fractions.

While Pythia and Herwig provide a good description of tt events [176], they are insufficient tomodel multijet and W + multijet background events. Particularly critical is the generation of W +heavy flavour jets. In Run I of the Tevatron W + jets events were generated with the Vecbos MonteCarlo program [177], in Run II the Alpgen program is used [178], which generates high multiplicitypartonic final states based on exact leading order matrix elements. The parton level events are passedto Herwig for showering and hadronization and to QQ for the decay of heavy flavour hadrons. Toreproduce the entire W + multijets spectrum several Alpgen samples have to be accurately mergedtogether.

Monte Carlo event generators output a list of stable particles which can be fed to a full detectorsimulation that reproduces the interaction of those particles with the detector material. The simulationcode is based on the Geant package [179] which allows to implement a detailed geometry descriptionof the detector, track particles through the given detector volumes and compute their energy loss aswell as multiple scattering. In the so called digitization step the energy depositions obtained fromGeant are converted into raw detector data which are in the same format as physics data recordedfrom real collisions. Most detectors are described by parametric models that convert energy depositsinto detector signals. The parameters of the models are tuned to correctly reproduce the detectorresponse. The silicon detector response, for example, can be modelled by a simple geometrical modelbased on the path length of the ionizing particle and a Landau distribution measured from physicsdata. The raw data obtained from Monte Carlo events are then subjected to the same reconstructioncode as data from collisions. These reconstructed Monte Carlo data can then be analysed in the sameway as if they would contain physics events. Monte Carlo samples generated in this way are used tocompute acceptances for certain physics processes and to compare kinematic distributions betweendata and predictions.

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5. The quest for the top quark

Immediately after the discovery of the b quark in 1977 the existence of a weak isospin doublet partner,the top quark, was hypothesised. The mass of the sixth quark was unknown and a wealth of predictionsappeared based on many different speculative ideas, see for example references [180, 181, 182]. Typicalexpectations were in the mass range of about 20GeV/c2, which became accessible two years later withmeasurements at the PETRA e+e− collider.

5.1. Early searches

In e+e− annihilations tt pairs can be produced by the exchange of a virtual photon or Z boson. Themass hierarchy of Standard Model quarks is beautifully reflected in a measurement of the ratio of theproduction rate of hadrons to that for muon pairs, R = σ(e+e− → hadrons)/σ(e+e− → µ+µ−), as afunction of the centre-of-mass energy

√s. The ratio R is given by R(s) = 3

Q2i , where the sum

is over all quark flavours with production thresholds greater than√s. This corresponds to a step

function, which is only altered near production thresholds where strong resonance effects occur. Ifone compares R above the tt production threshold to its value below (but above the threshold for bbproduction) one expects to see an increase by ∆R = 4/3.

Between 1979 and 1984 the five experiments at the PETRA collider, CELLO, JADE, MARK J,PLUTO, and TASSO, measured R at several centre-of-mass energies ranging from 12 to 46.8 GeVin steps of about 20 to 30 MeV [183, 184, 185, 186, 187]. No indication of top quark productionwas found. The final lower limit of the top quark mass derived from PETRA measurements was23GeV/c2.

At the KEK laboratory in Japan a dedicated accelerator, TRISTAN, was built to search for thetop quark in e+e− annihilations, with slightly increased centre-of-mass energy than PETRA. Themaximum energy reached was 61.4 GeV. Between 1987 and 1990 several consecutive searches for topquark production were presented by the two experiments operating at TRISTAN (AMY and VENUS).Again, no evidence for the top quark was found and the final lower limit on the top quark mass was30.2 GeV/c2 [188, 189].

In 1989 the Large Electron Position collider (LEP) at CERN and the Stanford Linear Collider(SLC) started e+e− collisions at the Z0 pole,

√s ≈ 90 GeV. The experiments at these accelerators –

ALEPH, DELPHI, OPAL and L3 at LEP, and SLD at SLC – searched for Z0 → tt events of varioustopologies [190, 191, 192, 193]. The best lower limit on the top quark mass obtained from these directsearches was 45.8GeV/c2.

In the mid 1980s experiments at hadron colliders joined experiments at e+e− machines in the questfor the top quark. In contrast to e+e− annihilations, searches in hadronic collisions have to deal withhigh backgrounds and thus model independent analyses are not feasible. Instead the experimentshad to concentrate on SM signatures. Initially, one assumed the top quark mass to be below themass of the W boson. Top quark production via the electroweak interaction was expected to be thedominating process at the CERN SppS collider operating at

√s = 546 GeV, later at

√s = 630 GeV.

The experiments UA1 and UA2 searched for events were an on-shell W boson is produced whichdecays into a top and a bottom quark: pp → W± → tb/tb. The top quark was reconstructed in itssemileptonic decay mode into a b quark, a charged lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino.

First results reported by UA1 in 1984 seemed to be consistent with the production of top quarks ofmass (40±10)GeV/c2 [194]. UA1 observed six events with one isolated lepton, 3 electron and 3 muonevents, and 2 hadronic jets. The effective invariant mass distribution of the lepton, the two jets and themissing transverse energy shows a pronounced peak at the W mass, while the mass of the lepton, themissing transverse energy and the jet with the lowest transverse energy clustered around 40 GeV/c2.The number of background events where the lepton was faked by a hadron or background events from

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heavy flavour production were believed to be negligible. Thus, these six events were interpreted asa first indication of a top quark originating from a W boson decay. However, subsequent analysesby UA1 were based on a more complete evaluation of the backgrounds and did not support thisresult [195]. Since UA1 did not apply a minimum cut on the missing transverse energy in the event,backgrounds due the fake leptons, Drell-Yan production of lepton pairs, ℓ+ℓ−, as well as backgroundsfrom bb and cc production were found to be more significant than originally estimated.

The final UA1 top quark analysis was published in 1990 and used data corresponding to anintegrated luminosity of 5.4 pb−1. The observed events were found to be consistent with the non-top backgrounds, and a lower limit on the top quark mass of 60GeV/c2 was set [196]. A slightlybetter limit was achieved by the second experiment operating at the CERN SppS, UA2, based on anintegrated luminosity of 7.1 pb−1 [197]. UA2 used only events containing an isolated central electronwith peT > 12 GeV/c and ET/ > 15 GeV. After all selection cuts 137 events were retained, in goodagreement with the expectation of 154.4± 14.6 background events. To further enhance the sensitivityof the analysis the transverse mass of the electron and the missing transverse energy

M eνT =

2 peTET/ · (1− cos∆φeν )

was formed, where ∆φeν is the azimuthal angle between the electron and ET/ vectors. The limit onthe top quark mass were obtained by fitting the observed M eν

T distribution to template distributionsof background events alone or a combination of background and a top quark signal of certain mass.As a result, top quark masses below 69GeV/c2 were excluded.

It is important to note that experiments at hadron colliders do not provide a direct limit on thetop quark mass, but rather on the top quark production cross section. The mass limits are derivedusing the theoretically predicted production cross sections, that depend on the top quark mass, andthe predicted branching ratios. Systematic uncertainties on these predictions have thus to be properlyaccounted for.

5.2. Searches and discovery at the Tevatron

In 1988 the CDF experiment at the Tevatron joined the race for discovery of the top quark. Dueto the higher centre-of-mass energy at the Tevatron of

√s = 1.8 TeV top quarks are predominantly

produced as tt pairs. The first CDF top quark search uses a data sample with an integrated luminosityof 4.4 pb−1 accumulated in Run 0 which lasted from 1988 to 1989 [198, 199]. CDF pursued a similarstrategy as UA2 and used the M eν

T distribution to discriminate between W+jets background events,where theW boson decays on shell, and top quark decays where the electron and the neutrino originatefrom the exchange of a virtual W (this was still under the assumption that Mtop < MW +Mb). Theanalysis is based on isolated central electron events with an electromagnetic transverse energy above20 GeV and ET/ > 20 GeV. In addition, at least two hadronic jets with ET > 10 GeV and |η| < 2.0are required. This analysis pushed the lower limit of the top quark mass to Mtop > 77GeV/c2 usingpredictions of the cross section by Altarelli et al. [89, 85].

In addition to the search in the electron-plus-jets channel CDF performed an analysis in theelectron-plus-muon (eµ) dilepton channel [200]. By requiring two leptons from different families,backgrounds from Drell-Yan and Z0 production as well as W+jets events are strongly suppressed.The remaining background is mainly due to Z0 → τ+τ− events. Subsequently, CDF extended thedilepton analysis to include the ee and µµ channels. Backgrounds from Drell-Yan and Z0 events arereduced by additional requirements: (1) The dilepton azimuthal opening angle ∆φℓℓ is required to bebelow 160◦. (2) ee or µµ events with a dilepton invariant mass in the window 75 < Mℓℓ < 105 GeV/c2

or with ET/ < 20 GeV are rejected. The lepton+jets analysis was also further improved. High-pTmuons from the decay of a W boson were included and a soft muon b tag for at least one of thejets was required to reduce the W+multijet background. The dilepton and the lepton+jets analysis

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 45

were combined to derive a common limit on the tt cross section σtt. Using theoretical expectationsfor σtt [90], and assuming SM decays for the top quark, the cross section limit was translated intoa lower limit on the top quark mass of Mtop > 91GeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level [201, 202].It is important to realize that with the top quark mass being above the sum of the W and the bquark mass, the transverse mass M eν

T is no longer a suitable discriminant and a strategy change isnecessary. Therefore, later CDF analyses were based on counting events only, rather than fitting theM eν

T distribution.In 1992, with the start of Tevatron Run I, the DØ experiment joined the hunt for the top quark.

In April of 1994 DØ published its first top quark analysis setting the last lower limit on the top quarkmass before its discovery [203]. The data sample was recorded in 1992/93 and corresponds to anintegrated luminosity of 15 pb−1. In this analysis DØ uses the eµ and the ee mode of the dileptonchannel and the lepton-plus-jets channels. In eµ events one electron with ET > 15 GeV and one muonwith pT > 15 GeV/c, ET/ > 20 GeV and at least one jet with ET > 15 GeV are required. For eecandidates tighter cuts are applied, the two electrons must have ET > 20 GeV and ET/ > 25 GeV.To suppress Z0 → e+e− background the cut on missing transverse energy is raised to 40 GeV withina mass window of |Mee − MZ | < 12 GeV/c2, where Mee is the dielectron invariant mass. In theelectron+jets mode one electron with ET > 20 GeV, at least four jets with ET > 15 GeV, andET/ > 30 GeV are required. In muon+jets events the cut on the missing transverse energy is slightlyrelaxed: ET/ > 20 GeV. To further reduce the W+jets background DØ performs a topological analysisof the events. The event shape is characterised by the aplanarity A which is a quantity proportionalto the lowest eigenvalue of the momentum tensor of the observed objects. In e+jets events a cut ofA > 0.08 is applied, in µ+jets events A > 0.1 is demanded. After all analysis cuts two dilepton andone e+jets event are observed, consistent with background estimates. The intersection of the derivedupper limit on the tt cross section with the theoretical prediction [92] yields a lower limit on the topquark mass of 131GeV/c2 [203].

In 1993 and 1994 CDF saw mounting evidence for a top quark signal. The detector upgradefor Run I, mainly the addition of a silicon vertex detector, was the keystone for the discovery of thetop quark at CDF. The new silicon detector allowed for the reconstruction of secondary vertices ofb hadrons and a measurement of the transverse decay length Lxy with a typical precision of 130µm.Secondary vertex b tagging proved to be a very powerful tool to discriminate the top quark signalagainst the W+jets background and increase the sensitivity of the lepton-plus-jets tt analysis. In July1994 CDF published a paper announcing first evidence for tt production at the Tevatron based onevents in the dilepton and the lepton-plus-jets channel [204, 166]. The analysis uses a data samplewith an integrated luminosity of (19.3 ± 0.7) pb−1. Two eµ dilepton events pass the selection cuts,but no ee or µµ events. The expected background in the dilepton channel is 0.56+0.25

−0.13. In the lepton-plus-jets channel three or more jets with ET > 15 GeV and |η| < 2.0 are required. Secondary vertexand soft lepton b tagging reduce the W+jets background. Six events with a secondary vertex tag areobserved over a background of 2.3±0.3 events. Seven events have a soft lepton tag (muon or electron)over a background of 3.1± 0.3 events. The soft lepton and the secondary vertex tagged samples havean overlap of three events.

Since the cross section of W+jets production cannot be reliably predicted with sufficiently smalluncertainties, special techniques had to be developed for estimating backgrounds in the lepton-plus-jets search directly from data. This technique assumes that the heavy quark content (b and c) of jetsin the W+jets sample is the same as in an inclusive jet sample. This assumption is a conservativeoverestimate of the backgrounds, since the inclusive jet sample contains heavy quark contributionsfrom direct production (e.g. gg → bb), gluon splitting (where a final state gluon branches into aheavy quark pair), and flavour excitation (where an initial state gluon excites a heavy sea quark inthe proton or antiproton), while heavy quarks in W+jets events are expected to be produced entirelyfrom gluon splitting. Tag rates are measured in an inclusive jet sample and parametrized by the ET

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Figure 18. Reconstructed top mass distributions as published (a) in the CDF evidence paper of1994 [204] and (b) in the CDF discovery paper [205]. The solid histogram shows CDF data. Thedotted line shows the shape of the expected background, the dashed line the sum of background plustt Monte Carlo events for Mtop = 175 GeV/c2. In both plots, the inset shows the likelihood curveused to determine the top quark mass.

and track multiplicity of each jet. The parametrization is used to derive an estimate on the numberof expected background events based on the W+jets sample before applying the b tag algorithms.The probability that the estimated background has fluctuated up to the total number of 12 candidateevents, taking into account that three events have double tags, is found to be 0.26%. This correspondsto a 2.8 σ excess for a Gaussian probability function.

Assuming that the excess of b tagged lepton-plus-jets events is due to tt production a valuefor the top quark mass is estimated using a constrained kinematic fit. In the W+3 jets sampleone additional soft jet with ET > 8 GeV and |η| < 2.4 is required. Seven events of the b taggedlepton-plus-jets sample pass this requirement and are fitted individually to the tt hypothesis. Foreach event the 12 possible combinations of the jets, the lepton and the missing transverse energy areconsidered. The combination with the best χ2 is chosen. The resulting top mass distribution, shown infigure 18a, is fitted to a sum of the expected distributions fromW+jets and tt production for differenttop quark masses. The fit yields a value of Mtop = (174 ± 10+13

−12) GeV/c2. The corresponding loglikelihood distribution is depicted in figure 18a. In November 1994 the DØ collaboration confirmedthe evidence seen at CDF. An update of the previous DØ analysis, now with an integrated luminosityof (13.5± 1.6) pb−1, added soft muon b tagging [206, 167]. In total, DØ observed nine events over abackground of 3.8± 0.9.

As Run I continued more data were accumulated and finally, in April 1995, CDF and DØ wereable to claim discovery of the top quark [205, 207]. CDF used a data sample corresponding to 67 pb−1

and significantly improved its secondary vertex b tagging techniques. The efficiency to identify at leastone b quark jet in a tt event with more than three measured jets was found to be (42 ± 5)%, almostdouble the previous value of the 1994 analysis. In the new analysis the background estimate is alsoconsiderably improved. While the mistag rate due to track mismeasurements is again measured withsamples of inclusive jets, the fractions of W+jets events that are Wbb or Wcc are disentangled fromMonte Carlo samples, applying measured tagging efficiencies. There are 27 jets with a secondary

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Figure 19. Fitted mass distribu-tion for candidate events (histogram)of the DØ discovery paper [207]. Over-laid is the expected mass distributionfor top quark events with Mtop =199 GeV/c2 (dotted curve), the back-ground (dashed curve), and the sum oftop and background (solid curve) for(a) the standard and (b) the loose eventselection.

Year1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005

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Figure 20. History of the quest forthe top quark. The shaded histogramshows experimental lower limits on thetop quark mass. Theoretical predic-tions based on flavour symmetries areshown (dots) as well as predictionsbased on electroweak precision mea-surements (squares). Direct measure-ments of Mtop by CDF and DØ arerepresented by the triangle (trianglespointing up: CDF; triangles pointingdown: DØ ).

vertex b tag in 21 W+ ≥ 3 jets events. The estimated background is 6.7± 2.1 b tags. The probabilityfor this observation to be a background fluctuation is 2 · 10−5. The 1995 dilepton and soft lepton btag lepton-plus-jets analyses are only slightly changed compared to those of 1994. Six dilepton eventsare observed over a background of 1.3± 0.3. There are 23 soft lepton tags observed in 22 events, with15.4 ± 2.0 b tags expected from background sources. Six events contain both a jet with a secondaryvertex and a soft lepton tag. The probability for all CDF data events to be due to a backgroundfluctuation alone is 1 ·10−6, which is equivalent to a 4.8 σ deviation in a Gaussian distribution. Againthe top quark mass is kinematically reconstructed for W+ ≥ 4 jets events as described above. Themass distribution is shown in figure 18b. The best fit is obtained for Mtop = (176± 8± 10) GeV/c2.

Simultaneously to CDF the DØ collaboration updated its top quark analyses based on datawith an integrated luminosity of 50 pb−1 [207]. The updated analysis is very similar to the previoussearches, involving the dilepton channel, soft muon b tagging and the topological analysis. From allchannels, DØ observes 17 events with an expected background of 3.8 ± 0.6 events. The probabilityfor this measurement to be an upward fluctuation of the background is 2 · 10−6, which correspondsto 4.6 standard deviations for a Gaussian probability distribution. To measure the top quark mass,lepton+4 jets events are subjected to a constrained kinematic fit. The resulting top quark massdistribution is shown in figure 19 for the standard cuts (a) and looser selection requirements (b).A likelihood fit to the observed mass distribution yields a central value for the top quark mass ofMtop = 199+19

−21 (stat.)± 22 (syst.) GeV/c2.In September 1995 CDF completed the series of publications establishing the top quark discovery

with a complementary kinematic analysis without b tagging, that used the ET of the second and thirdhighest ET jets to calculate a relative likelihood for each event to be top quark like or backgroundlike [208, 209]. The probability for the observed data to be due to a background fluctuation was foundto be 0.26%.

Finally, 17 years after the discovery of the b quark its weak isospin partner, the top quark,was firmly established. In figure 20 we summarise the long lasting quest for the top quark. The

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figure shows the lower experimental limits on the top quark mass (histogram) [186, 210, 211, 185,212, 195, 198, 201, 203], theoretical predictions mainly based on flavour symmetries within the quarkmass matrix (dots) [182, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218] and predictions based on electroweak precisionmeasurements at LEP and SLC (squares) [219, 220, 221, 48, 222, 223] as discussed in section 2.3.The direct measurements by CDF [204, 205, 224, 104] and DØ [207, 225, 226, 106] are also included(triangles). The good agreement between the measured top quark mass and the prediction obtainedfrom electroweak precision measurements constituted a major success of the Standard Model.

6. tt cross section measurements

Within the SM the tt cross section is calculated with a precision of about 15% [99, 91], see alsosection 3.1.4. The SM further predicts that the top quark decays to a W boson and a b quark witha branching ratio close to 100%. Measuring the cross section in all possible channels tests both,production and decay mechanisms of the top quark. A significant deviation from the SM predictionwould indicate either the presence of a new production mechanism, e.g. a heavy resonance decayinginto tt pairs, or a novel decay mechanism, e.g. into supersymmetric particles. The tt cross sectiondepends sensitively on the top quark mass. In the mass interval of 170 ≤ Mtop ≤ 190GeV/c2 thecross section drops by roughly 0.2 pb for an increase of 1 GeV/c2 inMtop. This theoretically predicteddependence can be exploited to turn a cross section measurement into an indirect determination ofthe top quark mass. A 15% measurement of the cross section is approximately equivalent to a 3%measurement ofMtop. One can also turn the argument around and use the measurements of the crosssection and the top quark mass and test their compatibility with the theoretically predicted crosssection and its mass dependence as indicated in figure 9 in section 3.1.4.

The tt cross section measurements are very fundamental to top quark physics at the Tevatron,since these analyses isolate data samples that are enriched in tt events and lay thereby the foundationsfor further investigations of top quark properties. The tt cross section has been measured in thedilepton, the lepton-plus-jets and the all hadronic channel. So far the tt tau modes evaded observation.In this section we discuss the experimental methods applied in tt cross section measurements in moredetail. We highlight representative Tevatron analyses for different channels and analyses methods,either from CDF or DØ. A comprehensive summary of all measurements and the combined crosssection results is presented in section 6.4.

6.1. Dilepton channel

As mentioned in section 4.4 the dilepton channel comprises tt final states with two high pT chargedleptons (electrons or muons), ET/ and two b quark jets. This clean signature allows to select a tt samplewith high purity, reaching a signal to background ratio between 1.5 and 3 depending on the analysis.In 2004 CDF published its first tt cross section measurement at

√s = 1.96TeV in the dilepton channel

based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of Lint = (197± 12) pb−1 [227], i.e. about twiceas much data as used in Run I. Two complementary analyses are performed. The first one requiresboth leptons to be specifically identified as either electrons or muons, while the second technique allowsone of the leptons to be identified only as a high-pT isolated track, thereby significantly increasingthe lepton detection efficiency at cost of a moderate increase in the expected backgrounds. In thefollowing we will concentrate the discussion on the second, the lepton-plus-track analysis.

At trigger level the data samples used in dilepton analyses are selected by finding events thateither contain a central electron or muon candidate with ET > 18 GeV, or an electron candidate inthe forward calorimeter with ET > 20 GeV and ET/ > 15 GeV. In the offline analysis two oppositelycharged leptons with ET > 20 GeV are required. One lepton, the “tight” lepton has to pass strictlepton identification criteria and be isolated. Tight electrons have a well measured track pointing at

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an energy deposition in the calorimeter. For electrons with |η| > 1.2, this track association is made bya calorimeter-seeded silicon tracking algorithm. Tight muons must have a well-measured track linkedto a track segment in the muon chambers and an energy deposition in the calorimeters consistentwith that expected for muons. The second lepton, the “loose” lepton, is defined as a well-measured,isolated track with pT > 20 GeV/c and a pseudorapidity of |η| < 1.0.

Candidate events must have a ET/ > 25 GeV. The value of ET/ is corrected for all loose leptonsif the associated calorimeter ET is less than 70% of the track pT. Events are rejected if the vectorET/ lies within 5◦ of the loose lepton axis and ET/ < 50 GeV. Jets are counted with a threshold ofET > 20GeV and within the pseudorapidity range of |η| < 2.0. At least two jets defined in thatway are required. Candidates being compatible with cosmic ray muons or photon conversions areremoved. To remove dilepton pairs due to Z0 boson production the cut on the missing transverseenergy is tightened to ET/ > 40 GeV in a window of ±15 GeV/c2 around the Z0 mass.

The dominant backgrounds to tt dilepton events are Drell-Yan (qq → Z/γ∗ → ℓ+ℓ−) production,misidentified (fake) leptons in W → ℓν + jets events where one jet is falsely reconstructed as a leptoncandidate, and diboson (WW , WZ, and ZZ) production. The Drell-Yan background is estimated bya combination of fully simulated Pythia Monte Carlo events and CDF data. A sample of Z bosoncandidates in the mass range of 76 – 106 GeV/c2 is selected. The numbers of events passing thenominal tt selection or a Drell-Yan specific selection are obtained, respectively. These two numbersprovide the normalization for the expected Drell-Yan background contributions to the tt dileptonsample as obtained from Monte Carlo. The rate of lepton misidentification is obtained from aninclusive jet sample after removing sources of real leptons such as W and Z boson decays. Theaccuracy and robustness of the derived lepton fake rate is checked with several control samples andgood agreement is found within the statistical uncertainties. The diboson background estimates arederived by calculating the acceptances from Monte Carlo and applying the theoretical cross sectionswhich have a relatively small uncertainty. The total number of background events expected in thedata sample is 6.9 ± 1.7 of which 61% are due to Drell-Yan processes, 22% are due to fake leptons,and 17% are due to diboson production. CDF observes 18 events in data. The tt cross section iscalculated according to the formula

σ(tt ) =Nobs −Nbkg

ǫevt · Lint, (26)

where Nobs is the number of observed events, Nbkg is the number of expected background events,and ǫevt is the event detection efficiency which includes the kinematic acceptance, trigger andreconstruction efficiencies, and the branching ratio into dilepton events. The event detection efficiencyis ǫevt = (0.88± 0.12)%, including a branching ratio of BR(W → ℓν) = 10.8% for the W boson decayinto a charged lepton plus neutrino. The kinematic acceptance is evaluated for a top mass of Mtop =175GeV/c2. The resulting value of the cross section is 7.0+2.7

−2.3 (stat.)+1.5−1.3 (syst.) ± 0.4 (lumi.) pb,

which is in very good agreement with the theoretical prediction of 6.7+0.7−0.9 pb [91]. The distributions

of various kinematic variables are found to be consistent with the SM prediction as obtained fromPythia Monte Carlo. As an example, the distribution of the scalar sum of all transverse energies inthe event is shown in figure 21. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test of this distribution yields a p-value of75%.

6.2. Lepton-plus-jets channel

The signature of the tt lepton-plus-jets channel comprises a high-pT electron or muon, missingtransverse energy and four jets, see section 4.4. The branching fraction of this channel is about30% which is one of the advantages over the dilepton channel. However, W + multijet backgroundsare large and call for dedicated strategies to improve the signal to background ratio. In this section

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we discuss four important methods to reduce backgrounds in the lepton-plus-jets channel and obtaina measurement of the tt cross section.

6.2.1. Topological analyses The production of two very heavy objects in tt events is reflected inseveral kinematic distributions that describe the general event topology. Some analyses take advantageof the fact that the scalar sum of transverse energies, HT, tends to be much higher in tt events thanin background events. This is due to the fact that jets originating from the decay of a heavy objectare typically much harder, i.e. higher in ET, than those from gluon radiation. Other analyses utilisethe higher spherical symmetry of tt events. More recent analyses combine several kinematic variablesinto one kinematic discriminant using a neural network [228].

We discuss here in more detail the final DØ topological analysis used to measure the tt crosssection in Run I at

√s = 1.8TeV [105]. This analysis marks the final result of the technique used in

DØ to discover the top quark in the lepton-plus-jets channel in 1995 [207]. The data were selectedby a lepton-plus-jets trigger, requiring one loosely identified electron or muon and at least one jet.The electron data set corresponds to a luminosity of 119.5 pb−1, the muon data set to 107.7 pb−1.The offline selection asks for an isolated, well identified electron with ET > 20GeV and |η| ≤ 2.0or an isolated, well identified muon with pT > 20GeV/c and |η| ≤ 1.7. The missing transverseenergy as calculated in the calorimeter has to be above 25 GeV for electron-plus-jets events and above20 GeV for muon-plus-jets events. The pseudorapidity of the reconstructed W boson is required tobe |η(W )| ≤ 2.0. Jets are counted with a threshold of ET > 15GeV and |η| < 2.0. Events with fouror more jets are accepted. To avoid an overlap with the soft muon tt analysis events with jets having

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a soft muon b tag are excluded.Three topological variables are used to further discriminate between signal and background: (1)

the HT variable which is defined as the scalar sum of all transverse jet energies using the jet definitionas mentioned above, (2) the scalar sum of ET/ and the lepton pT which is denoted EL

T, and (3) theaplanarity A which is an event shape variable quantifying the “flatness” of an event and is defined as32 times the smallest eigenvalue of the normalized laboratory momentum tensor M of the observedphysics objects. The tensor M is defined by:

Mij =

k pki pkj∑

k |pk|2(27)

where pk is the three momentum of the object k and the indices i and j are the x, y and z coordinates.The sum runs over all objects under consideration, i.e. all jets defined by the cuts ET > 15GeV and|η| < 2.0, and the W boson reconstructed from the lepton and ET/ . Large values of A are indicativeof spherical events, whereas small values correspond to more planar events. The following cuts ontopological variables are used: HT > 180GeV, EL

T > 60GeV and A > 0.065. These cuts result froman optimization procedure such that the smallest error on the measured cross section and the bestsignal to background ratio S/B are achieved.

The main backgrounds to the topological tt analysis arise fromW +jets events and QCD multijetevents that contain a misidentified electron or an isolated muon and mismeasured ET/ . The backgroundestimate proceeds in three major steps. In a first step the QCD multijet background is estimated asa function of jet multiplicity from data samples where all selection cuts except the three topologicalcuts are applied. The electron and the muon samples are treated separately because processes thatgive rise to a misidentified electron or an isolated muon are significantly different.

Jets that produce showers with a large fraction of the energy in the electromagnetic calorimetercan sometimes pass the electron selection criteria and be falsely identified as an electron. To determinethe rate of multijet events containing such misidentified electrons one examines the ET/ spectrum ofevents that pass the electron trigger but fail the full offline electron identification. These eventscorrectly describe the shape of the ET/ distribution of QCD multijet events, while the normalizationhas to be found by matching the number of events at low ET/ between this background sample andthe sample where the full electron identification has been applied. The number of events in the tail ofthe normalized distribution above ET/ > 25GeV provides an estimate on the number of QCD multijetbackground events.

Muons from semileptonic b of c quark decays are normally within a jet, i.e. they are nonisolated.However, occasionally the decay kinematics is such, that there is insufficient hadronic energy toproduce a jet. In this case the muons from heavy quark decays appear to be isolated and constitutethe major source of QCD multijet background in the muon-plus-jets sample. The rate of isolatedmuons from heavy quark decays is measured using multijet samples with ET/ < 20GeV.

The multijet background is estimated for each inclusive W + jet multiplicity sample. In thee+ ≥ 4 jets sample the background is estimated to be 7.2 ± 2.2 events, in the µ+ ≥ 4 jets sample13.9± 4.4 events.

In the second step of the background estimate the rate of W + multijet events is computedusing a fit to the jet multiplicity spectrum that remains after the subtraction of the QCD multijetbackground. This method exploits a simple exponential relationship between the number of eventsand the jet multiplicity

σ(W + n jets)

σ(W + (n− 1) jets)= α , (28)

where α is a constant that depends on the specific jet definition, i.e. the clustering algorithm as well asthe ET and η requirements. Relation (28) is known as “Berends scaling” [229, 230] and based on theassumption that the observed jets come from gluon radiation where the emission of each additional

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jet is suppressed by a factor of the strong coupling constant αs. A fit to the observed DØ data yieldsa scaling parameter of α = 0.18 ± 0.01 for electron data and α = 0.19 ± 0.02 for muon data. Thesefit values are used to predict the number of background events in the W+ ≥ 4 jets sample and arefound to be 44.8± 8.6 events for electron-plus-jets events and 25.8± 4.6 events for the muon-plus-jetssample. As a side remark it has to be noted that α cannot simply be identified with αs, since thevariation of αs in the PDFs has to be taken into account [231]. If this is properly done the sensitivityto αs is largely lost.

In the third step the cut efficiencies for the topological cuts are computed and then applied tothe previously derived background estimate for the W+ ≥ 4 jets sample. The efficiency on the QCDmultijet background is again derived from data, while the efficiency on the W + jets background istaken from events generated with the Vecbos Monte Carlo program [177]. After applying all cutsthe total background is predicted to be 4.51± 0.91 in the e+ ≥ 4 jets sample and 4.32± 1.04 eventsin the µ+ ≥ 4 jets sample, while 9 or 10 events are observed in data, respectively.

The event detection efficiency ǫevt for the tt signal is determined fromHerwigMonte Carlo eventsthat were passed through the DØ detector simulation. For a top quark mass of Mtop = 170GeV/c2

a value of ǫevt = (1.29 ± 0.23)% is found for the electron sample, and ǫevt = (0.91 ± 0.27)% for themuon sample. Using ǫevt determined for a top mass of Mtop = 172.1GeV/c2 as measured by DØ thecross section is computed to be (2.8±2.1) pb in the electron-plus-jets channel and (5.6±3.7) pb in themuon-plus-jets channel. Figure 22 shows the aplanarity versus HT plane for the background samples,tt Monte Carlo and DØ data. The plots illustrate the effectiveness of reducing the background viathe cuts on the topological variables HT and A.

6.2.2. Secondary vertex tag While each tt event features two b quark jets, only about 2% of theW + jets background contain a b quark. Therefore, the tt signal can be significantly enhanced byidentifying b quark jets. Three different b jet identification methods are discussed in section 4.5.4.In CDF the secondary vertex tagging method proved to be the most effective one, yielding the crosssection measurement with the smallest total uncertainty.

We present here a summary of the first CDF Run II tt cross section measurement usinglepton-plus-jets events with secondary vertex b tagging [168]. The b tagging method has alreadybeen presented in section 4.5.4. That is why we concentrate here on the event selection and thebackground estimate. The analysis uses a data sample triggered by high momentum electrons ormuons corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 162 pb−1. The electron selection requires anisolated cluster in the central calorimeter with ET > 20GeV matched to a track with pT > 10GeV/c.Muon candidates have a track in the drift chamber with pT > 20GeV/c that is matched to a tracksegment in the muon chambers. Events consistent with being photon conversions (electrons) or cosmicrays (muons) are rejected. The missing transverse energy is required to be ET/ > 20GeV. By requiringone and only one well identified lepton tt dilepton events and Z → e+e−/µ+µ− events are suppressed.To improve the removal efficiency for Z bosons, events are also removed if a second, less stringentlyidentified lepton is found that forms an invariant massMℓℓ with the primary lepton within the windowof 76 < Mℓℓ < 106GeV/c2. Jets are defined as clusters in the hadronic calorimeter with ET > 15GeVand |η| < 2.0. At least three jets are required for an event to fall into the signal region. One of thesejets has to be identified as containing a b quark using the secondary vertex tag algorithm. The finalcut is on the total transverse energy and demands HT > 200GeV, which rejects approximately 40%of the background while retaining 95% of tt signal events.

The secondary vertex tag algorithm is described in section 4.5.4. Figure 17a shows the distributionof the two-dimensional decay length of secondary vertices in the CDF data sample compared to the SMprediction of tt signal and background. Good agreement is found. The backgrounds to the secondaryvertex tagged sample are (i) direct QCD production of heavy flavour quarks without an associatedW boson (non-W QCD), (ii) W plus light quark jets events where one jet is falsely identified as

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heavy flavour (mistags), (iii) W plus heavy flavour jets, (iv) diboson production, single top quark,and Z → τ+τ− production. The estimate of these backgrounds is partially derived from CDF dataand partially from Monte Carlo. In particular, the number of b tagged W + jets background events iscalibrated with the number of observed W + jets events before b tagging. Therefore, the first step inthe background calculation is to estimate the number of background events that do not contain a Wboson in the pretag sample and subtract that background from the observed number of events.

(i) Non-W QCD background: The non-W background is mainly due to events where a jet ismisidentified as an electron and the ET/ is mismeasured, or due to muons from semileptonic b decayswhich pass the isolation criterion. Since the background sources in the electron and muon sampleare different, one has to treat these two samples separately. The non-W background estimate usesthe ET/ variable and the isolation variable Riso, that is defined as the ratio of calorimeter energy Eiso

contained in an isolation annulus of ∆R = 0.4 around the lepton (excluding the energy associated tothe lepton) divided by the lepton energy Eℓ. The Riso versus ET/ plane is divided into a signal region(Riso < 0.1 and ET/ > 20GeV) and three sideband regions. One assumes that the two variables areuncorrelated for non-W background events and calculates the number of background events in thesignal region as a simple proportion of events in the sideband regions. The contribution of true Wand tt events in the sideband regions is subtracted using Monte Carlo predictions normalized to theobserved number of events in the signal region. In the pretag e+ ≥ 3 jets sample (20 ± 5)% of theevents are estimated to be non-W events, in the µ+ ≥ 3 jets sample it is (7.5 ± 2.3)%. The pretagsample is defined as the data sample where all selection cuts have been applied except requiring a btag. In the final sample, after requiring a secondary vertex tag, about 18% of the total background isdue to non-W events.

(ii) Mistags: The mistag rate of the secondary vertex algorithm is measured using inclusivejet samples. Mistags are caused mostly by a random combination of tracks which are displacedfrom the primary vertex due to tracking errors. The main idea is to use the rate of events withnegative two-dimensional decay length as an estimate of the mistag rate. Corrections due to materialinteractions, long-lived light flavour particles (e.g. K0

s and Λ), and negatively tagged heavy flavourjets are determined using fits to the effective lifetime spectra of tagged vertices. The mistag rate isparameterized as a function of four jet variables: ET, the good track multiplicity, η and φ of the jetas well as one event variable, i.e. the scalar sum of the ET of all jets with ET > 8GeV. To estimatethe mistag background in the W + jets sample each jet in the pretag sample is weighted with itsmistag rate. The sum of weights over all jets in the sample is then scaled down by the fraction ofnon-W events in the pretag sample. Since the mistag rate per jet is sufficiently low, this prediction ofmistagged jets is a good estimate on the number of events with a mistagged jet. It is found that 34%of the background for the final tt selection are due to mistags.

(iii) W + heavy flavour: The production of a W boson in association with heavy flavour quarksis the main background to the tt signal with a secondary vertex tag. Heavy quarks occur in theprocess q1q2 → W + g where the gluon splits into a bb or a cc pair, and in the process gq → Wc. Asmentioned in section 4.6, the Alpgen Monte Carlo program [178] is used to generate several samplesof exclusive W + n jets final states. This includes W + bb/cc+ n jets, and Wc + jets. The Alpgen

generation is followed by showering with Herwig. To reproduce the entire W +multijets spectrumthe exclusive samples are merged together taking the appropriate cross sections into account. Thecombination procedure avoids double counting of jets produced at matrix element level with Alpgen

and hard jets produced by the showering in Herwig. A jet clustering algorithm is run at Monte Carloparticle level after showering but before detector simulation. These Monte Carlo jets are matched topartons generated at matrix element level. If extra jets occur, that do not match a parton, the eventis rejected.

While the shape of the W + n jets spectrum can be reproduced well by the Monte Carlo, theabsolute normalization has large theoretical uncertainties and is therefore taken from collider data.

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(a) (b)

(cm)τpseudo-c0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5

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+ c quark jets

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Figure 23. (a) Pseudo-cτ distribution for inclusive jet data. The distribution is used to measurethe heavy flavour fractions in the jet sample. The fitted contributions for the different heavy flavourcomponents and secondary interactions in light flavour jets are shown [168]. (b) Jet multiplicityspectrum for CDF data (dots), the total background expectation (dashed histogram), and the sumof background and the predicted tt signal (σ = 6.7 pb, full line).

The heavy flavour fractions predicted by Alpgen are found to be too small and are calibrated againstfractions measured in inclusive jet data. The composition of the inclusive jet sample is determinedby fitting the pseudo-cτ distribution for b tagged jets. The pseudo-cτ is defined as L2D ·Mvtx/p

vtxT ,

where L2D is the two-dimensional decay length (see also section 4.5.4), Mvtx is the invariant massof all tracks associated to the secondary vertex, and pvtxT is the transverse momentum of the vertex4-vector. Figure 23a shows the pseudo-cτ distribution for the inclusive jet data as well as the fittedheavy flavour components. The template distributions for heavy flavour jets used in the fit are takenfrom Alpgen Monte Carlo samples. The measured heavy flavour fractions in jet data are consistentlyhigher by 50% than the Alpgen prediction. Therefore, a correction factor of 1.5±0.4 is applied to theheavy flavour fractions in theW +multijets sample. The assumption here is that this correction factoris universal and can be transferred from the inclusive jets to the W +multijets sample. As a result,it is found, that the fraction of W + 4 jets events coming from the Wbb process is (4.8 ± 1.3)%, thefraction with one or two c jets from Wcc is (7.3±2.0)%, and the fraction of Wc events is (6.1±1.3)%.It has to be noted that the Wc fraction is directly taken from the Alpgen prediction and is notcorrected, since it is due to a different physics process.

The number ofW+ heavy flavour background events for the tt analysis is computed by multiplyingthe derived heavy quark fractions by the number of pretag events, after subtracting the non-Wbackground. The heavy flavour contributions to the total background in the tt candidate sample areas follows: 25% are due to Wbb, 8% due to Wcc and 6% due to Wc production.

(iv) Diboson, single top and Z → τ+τ−: There is a number of smaller backgrounds which canbe reliably predicted by combining the event detection efficiency for these processes as determinedfrom Monte Carlo events with the theoretically predicted cross section. This method is feasible, sincethe cross section predictions for diboson production processes, i.e. WW , WZ and ZZ, and singletop quark production have relatively small uncertainties. Diboson events can mimic a tt signal if oneboson decays leptonically and the other one decays into jets, where at least one jet is due to a b or cquark. In addition, Z + jet production can mimic tt events if the Z boson decays into τ+τ− and oneτ decays leptonically producing an isolated electron or muon, while the second τ decays hadronically.The contribution of diboson, Z → τ+τ− and single top events to the total background is found to be9%.

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The total background prediction is 13.5± 1.8 events, while 48 events are observed in the W+ ≥ 3jets sample. The clear excess of events is attributed to tt production. Figure 23b shows the jetmultiplicity spectrum for CDF data, the total background expectation, and the sum of backgroundand the predicted tt signal. A very good agreement between the data and the SM expectation isfound.

To compute the tt cross section according to (26), the event detection efficiency ǫevt for tt eventsis needed. It is obtained from a sample of Pythia tt Monte Carlo events. The trigger efficiency aswell as several correction factors that account for differences between data and Monte Carlo eventsare measured with control data samples. Particularly important is the correction factor for the btagging efficiency. A sample of inclusive electrons with pT > 7GeV is used for this purpose. Manyelectrons in this momentum regime originate from semileptonic b decays. Therefore, the sample isenriched in heavy flavour. Using a double tag technique it is found that the average tagging efficiencyof a b quark jet in data is (24 ± 1)%, while the Monte Carlo predicts (29 ± 1)%, thus yielding ab tagging correction factor of 0.82 ± 0.06, where the error includes systematic uncertainties. Theefficiency to tag at least one jet in a tt event, after all other cuts have been applied, is found to be(53.4 ± 3.2)%. The uncertainty is almost purely systematic. The overall event detection efficiency isǫevt = (3.84±0.40)%. This yields a cross section measurement of σ(tt) = 5.6+1.2

−1.1 (stat.)+0.9−0.6 (syst.) pb,

which is in good agreement with the theoretical expectation of 6.7+0.7−0.9 pb. The statistical uncertainty

is larger than the systematic one, but very soon, using more data, the systematic uncertainty will startto dominate the measurement. Although, having larger control samples at hand, it will be possibleto also reduce the systematic uncertainty.

6.2.3. Impact parameter tag The impact parameter b tagging algorithm is an alternative methodto identify b quark jets. The method also relies on the long lifetime of b hadrons, but the explicitreconstruction of a secondary vertex is not required. The algorithm rather asks for tracks with highimpact parameter significance and is explained in section 4.5.4. In the CDF Run II analysis presentedhere a jet is b tagged if its probability to be consistent with a zero lifetime hypothesis is below0.01 [232]. The b tagging efficiency of the algorithm is measured in inclusive electron data using adouble tag method. For heavy flavour jets with ET > 10GeV the average tagging efficiency is foundto be (19.7± 1.2)%.

The event selection for the tt cross section measurement is essentially the same as described insection 6.2.2 for the analysis using a secondary vertex b tag. There is one additional cut which requiresthat the ∆φ between the ET/ and the most energetic jet is within [0.5, 2.5] radians if ET/ < 30GeV. Thecut on HT is omitted. The background is estimated based on the same techniques as the measurementusing the secondary vertex tag. The mistag rate of light quark jets is measured in an inclusivejet data sample and found to be (1.11 ± 0.06)%. In a data sample corresponding to 162 pb−1 59W+ ≥ 3 jets events are observed after all cuts, while the total background is estimated to be 24.7+4.8

−4.6

events. The overall event detection efficiency is found to be ǫevt = (4.09 ± 0.61)% which includesthe event b tagging efficiency of (57.2 ± 3.9)%. As a result, the tt cross section is calculated to beσ(tt) = 5.8+1.3

−1.2 (stat.) ± 1.3 (syst.) pb, which is in good agreement with the result obtained with thesecondary vertex b tagging algorithm.

6.2.4. Soft lepton tag The third technique to identify b quark jets searches for electrons or muonswithin jets originating from semileptonic b decays. We present here a CDF analysis using a soft muontag [233]. A data sample with an integrated luminosity of 194 pb−1 is used. The event selection beforeb tagging is the same as for the secondary vertex tag analysis. After all cuts 337 events are retained.

The soft muon tag algorithm uses a global χ2 built from several characteristic distributions thatseparate muon candidates from background. A jet is considered as b tagged if it contains a muon with

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pT > 3GeV/c and χ2 < 3.5 within ∆R < 0.6 of the jet axis. Events are rejected if the isolated highpT lepton is a muon of opposite charge to the soft muon and the dimuon invariant mass is consistentwith a J/ψ, an Υ or a Z0. The efficiency to tag a tt event is approximately 15%, with small variationsbetween the W + 3 jets and W + 4 jets samples. The rate of background events where a light quarkjet is misidentified as containing a semileptonic b hadron decay is estimated from a sample of photon-plus-jets events. The misidentification probability of a track with pT > 3GeV/c and ∆R < 0.6 isfound to be about 0.7%.

In theW+ ≥ 3 jets data sample 20 events with a soft muon tag are found, while the total expectedbackground is estimated to be 9.5±1.1 events. The total event detection efficiency is ǫevt = (1.0±0.1)%and the resulting tt cross section is found to be σ(tt) = 5.3±+3.3 (stat.)+1.3

−1.0 (syst.) pb.

6.3. All hadronic channel

While the all hadronic channel has the largest branching ratio of all tt event categories, the QCDmultijet background is overwhelming and it is therefore very challenging to isolate a tt signal. Wepresent here a DØ analysis based on a Run II dataset corresponding to 162 pb−1 [234]. To enrich thesignal content secondary vertex b tagging and a multivariate analysis with artificial neural networksis employed.

The data sample is collected with a dedicated jet trigger at an average trigger efficiency of 74%.The event pre-selection asks for six or more jets, that are reconstructed with an algorithm using afixed cone radius of ∆R = 0.5. Jets are counted with ET > 15GeV and |η| < 2.5. Events that containan isolated lepton are rejected to obtain a dataset orthogonal to the lepton-plus-jets analysis. Thereconstruction of secondary vertices is used to identify b quark jets. A jet is considered to be taggedif a vertex with signed decay length significance larger than 7.0 is found. Exactly one b tagged jet isrequired. Double tagged events are rejected to ease the background estimation. The efficiency to tagexactly one jet in a hadronic tt event is determined to be 46%.

The multivariate analysis combines 13 kinematic or event shape variables using two neuralnetworks. The background sample for training the networks is obtained from the pretag data sample.A parametrization of the tagging rate is used to select events that have high probability to be tagged,but do in fact not have a tag. This ensures on one hand that the background sample is similar to thetagged events, but on the other hand is disjoint to the candidate sample. Signal Monte Carlo eventsare generated with Alpgen in combination with Pythia for showering and hadronization. After allcuts 220 candidate events are observed over a total background of 186±5 events. The event detectionefficiency is ǫevt = (2.8 ± 0.8)% including a hadronic branching ratio of 46.19%. The tt productioncross section is measured to be σ(tt) = 7.7+3.4

−3.3 (stat.)+4.7−3.8 (syst.)± 0.5 (lumi.) pb.

6.4. Cross section combination

In this section we summarise the final Run I tt cross section measurements and give a brief overview onthe status of the currently available Run II measurements. The measured cross sections are presentedin table 8. For Run I the cross sections obtained from combination of all tt event categories for CDFand DØ are also shown [103, 105]. The combined values should be compared to the predicted crosssection. Within the uncertainties good agreement is found.

In Run II various new techniques to measure the tt cross section are introduced. While thetraditional dilepton analysis uses two leptons that meet strict identification criteria, CDF added ananalysis where the identification of the second lepton is relaxed to increase the acceptance and reducethe statistical uncertainty. This analysis is discussed in more detail in section 6.1. Table 8 quotesthe combined value for both CDF dilepton analyses [227]. A third CDF dilepton analysis uses akinematic fit to the (ET/ ,Njet) phase space to disentangle the major SM processes contributing to the

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Table 8. Measurements of the tt cross section at the Tevatron. The CDF measurementsassume a top quark mass of Mtop = 175GeV/c2 [103, 235, 236], the DØ measurements useMtop = 172.1GeV/c2 [105]. In Run II a top mass of Mtop = 175GeV/c2 is assumed for themeasurements of both experiments. The DØ Run I lepton-plus-jets cross section is a combination ofthe topological analysis and the soft lepton tag analysis. The given uncertainties include statisticaland systematic contributions.

Run I at√s = 1.8TeV Run II at

√s = 1.96TeV

Channel CDF DØ CDF DØ

Dilepton 8.4+4.5−3.5 pb 6.0± 3.2 pb 7.0+2.9

−2.4 pb 14.3+5.8−4.8 pb

with secondary vertex tag 11.1+6.0−4.6 pb

global kinematic fit 8.6+2.7−2.6 pb

Lepton + jets 5.1± 1.9 pb

with secondary vertex tag 5.1± 1.5 pb 5.6+1.5−1.3 pb 8.6+1.7

−1.6 pb

with impact parameter tag 5.8± 1.8 pb 7.6+1.8−1.5 pb

with soft lepton tag 9.2± 4.3 pb 5.2+3.2−2.1 pb

with b-tag and kinematic fit 6.0± 2.0 pb

with neural networks 6.6± 1.9 pb

All hadronic 7.6+3.5−2.7 pb 7.3± 3.2 pb 7.5+3.9

−3.1 pb 7.7+5.8−5.1 pb

Combined 6.5+1.7−1.4 pb 5.7± 1.6 pb

Predicted [91] 5.2+0.5−0.7 pb 6.7+0.7

−0.9 pb

dilepton sample (global kinematic fit) [237]. DØ has made cross section measurements in a dileptondata sample without b tagging [238] and in a eµ sample using a secondary vertex tag [239].

The CDF lepton-plus-jets analyses using three different b tagging algorithms are presented insection 6.2. Based on a data set corresponding to 230 pb−1 the DØ collaboration has also presentedmeasurements using a secondary vertex b tag and an impact parameter tag [240]. CDF has performedtwo analyses that exploit kinematic properties of tt lepton-plus-jets events. One analysis uses thesample with secondary vertex tags and adds a likelihood fit to the transverse energy of the leadingjet [241]. The second analysis is based on the W+ ≥ 3 jets sample before b tagging and uses a neuralnetwork to construct a powerful discriminant between the backgrounds and the tt signal [228].

The DØ measurement of the tt cross section in the all hadronic channel [234] is discussed insection 6.3. The CDF Run II analysis in the all hadronic channel is similar to the DØ one, alsorequiring a secondary vertex b tag and exploiting several kinematic variables [242]. But CDF usessimple sequential cuts rather than a multivariate combination via a neural network. At present,combined results on the tt cross section in Run II are not yet available. The combination of thedifferent tt event categories (dilepton, lepton-plus-jets, all hadronic) is relatively straight forward,since the data sets are essentially orthogonal. However, the different analyses within a particularcategory are correlated, sometimes even strongly correlated. The correlation has to be determined

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and taken into account when a combination of the different analyses is done.

7. Top quark mass measurements

As discussed in section 2.3, the top quark mass is a very important parameter for the description ofelectroweak processes and precision tests of the SM. The main implication is that the SM relates themasses of the top quark, the W boson and the Higgs boson, such that precise measurements of Mtop

and MW imply a prediction forMH . Therefore, the precise measurement of the top quark mass is oneof the major goals of Run II at the Tevatron. However, since Run II results on the top quark mass arenot yet published, we describe in this chapter the two main methods used by CDF and DØ in Run Ito determine Mtop: (1) the template method of CDF, which fits template distributions for differenttop quark masses to the distribution observed in data, and (2) the matrix element method of DØ,which exploits the sensitivity of the leading order matrix element for tt production to Mtop. Bothmethods are also used in Run II to measure Mtop. In section 7.3 we discuss the combination of topquark mass measurements in different tt event categories and among the two Tevatron experiments.

7.1. Template method in tt lepton-plus-jets events

The best measurement of the top quark mass is achieved in the tt lepton-plus-jets channel, since itfeatures a relatively high number of candidate events, moderate background levels and allows for afull reconstruction of top quark momenta with reasonable accuracy. That is why we present here thefinal top quark mass measurement in lepton-plus-jets events at CDF in Run I [104]. The data sampleused in the analysis corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 106 pb−1. The event pre-selection isthe same as the one in the Run I tt cross section analysis [103], which is essentially the same as theRun II selection described in section 6.2.2. For the full reconstruction of tt candidate events a Wcandidate decaying into eν or µν and at least four jets are needed. Therefore, events in the W + 3jets sample are used only if they feature at least one additional jet with ET > 8GeV and |η| < 2.4.After pre-selection, but before requiring a b tag the candidate sample consists of 163 events. Foursubsamples are used to measure the top quark mass: (1) The first subsample contains events withtwo secondary vertex b tagged jets. (2) The second subsample consists of events with exactly onesecondary vertex tag. (3) The third subsample includes events with one or two soft lepton tags, butno secondary vertex tag. (4) The fourth subsample contains events with no b tag and at least fourjets with ET > 15GeV and |η| < 2.0. One very important issue for the top mass measurement is thereconstruction of jet energies, which is therefore detailed in the next section.

7.1.1. Jet energy corrections The reconstruction of the top quark momenta in a tt candidate eventis based on the assumption that the four leading jets can be identified with the primary partons fromthe top quark decay. To ensure the validity of this assumption several corrections have to be appliedto the raw jet energies as measured in the calorimeter. While the general concept of jet reconstructionis briefly introduced in section 4.5.3, we summarise here the jet corrections applied in the CDF topmass analysis.

(i) The relative energy correction accounts for non-uniformities in the calorimeter response as afunction of η and is derived from dijet data, where one jet is measured in the central calorimeter(0.2 < |η| < 0.7) and the second jet is in the forward region (1.1 < |η| < 4.2). The forwardcalorimeter is thus calibrated against the response in the central region. The uncertainty on therelative correction varies between 0.2% and 4%.

(ii) Corrections for multiple interactions. A fixed amount of energy ∆Emult = 0.297GeV/c issubtracted from the jet ET for each additional reconstructed primary vertex in the event.

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(iii) The absolute energy scale is a multiplicative factor that converts the energy observed in thejet cone into the average true jet energy. To derive the absolute correction the calorimetersimulation is tuned to agree with testbeam data of single electrons and pions. In a second stepseveral parameters controlling the fragmentation process in the Isajet Monte Carlo generator aretuned such, that the multiplicity distribution, the momentum spectrum, and the invariant massdistribution of charge particles, as well as the ratio of charged to neutral energy agree betweenIsajet and dijet data. The absolute correction accounts for the nonlinearity of the calorimeterand energy losses near the boundaries of detector modules. The systematic uncertainty on theabsolute energy scale is about 3%.

(iv) Underlying event corrections account for extra energy contained in the jet cone due to particlescoming from the fragmentation of partons that do not participate in the hard scattering of theprimary pp interaction. A fixed amount of 0.65GeV is subtracted from the ET of each jet . Thiscorrection is derived from minimum bias data.

(v) Out-of-cone corrections account for the energy that is physicswise associated to the jet but fallingout of the jet cone. The out-of-cone energy is related to low energy gluons emitted from initialpartons, also referred to as soft gluon radiation. The correction is derived from Monte Carloevents.

(vi) tt specific corrections are applied to the four leading jets and map their momenta to the momentaof the quarks from the tt decay. The corrections account for three effects: (a) The difference inthe jet ET spectrum of tt induced jets and the flat spectrum assumed in the previous corrections.(b) The energy loss in semileptonic b and c hadron decays, where the undetected neutrinos ormuons that loose only little of their energy in the calorimeter, carry away part of the energy of theprimary parton. (c) The multijet structure of tt events as compared to dijet events used to derivethe other corrections. While the jet corrections (i) through (v) are flavour independent the ttspecific corrections treat b jets differently than light quark jets. Four jet types are distinguished:(1) jets used to reconstruct the hadronic W decay, (2) jets assigned to the b quark from the topquark decay without b tag or jets with secondary vertex tag, (3) jets with a soft electron tag, (4)jets with a soft muon tag.

Within the ET range from 30 to 90 GeV the flavour independent corrections (number i through v)amount to an average correction factor of about 1.45. The total systematic uncertainty includingall corrections varies between 7% for jets with corrected ET of 20 GeV and 3.5% for jets withET = 150GeV.

7.1.2. Event-by-event top mass fitting For top mass fitting the four-momenta of the particles of thett decay chain are fully reconstructed. The four leading jets are assigned to the four quarks in the finalstate of the hard scattering. The mass of light quark jets is assumed to be 0.5 GeV/c2, the mass of bquarks is set to 5.0GeV/c2. The jet-parton assignment bears some ambiguity. If none of the jets istagged as a b jet candidate, there are 12 possible jet permutations. Including the two-fold ambiguityof the neutrino pz reconstruction, there are 24 combinations. With one b tag that number is reducedto 12, with two b tags there are only four possible assignments. For each event all of these possiblecombinations are tested. A kinematic fit based on a χ2 criterion is used to find the best combinationand determine the top quark mass on an event-by-event basis. The χ2 expression implements sixeffective kinematic constraints: (1,2) the two transverse momentum components of the tt+X systemmust be zero, (3) the invariant mass of the lepton and neutrino, Mℓν, must be equal to MW , (4) theinvariant mass of the two light quarks, Mjj , must be equal to MW , (5,6) the two three-body invariant

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Table 9. Number of expected and observed number of events in the four top mass subsamples.

Data sample Expected Background Expected Signal Observation

SVX double tag 0.2 6.1 5

SVX single tag 2.7 14.4 15

Soft Lepton Tag 5.0 4.0 14

No Tag 32.4 11.4 42

Total 40.3 35.9 76

masses, Mℓνj and Mjjj , must be equal to Mtop. The χ2 expression is given by

χ2 =∑

ℓ,jets

(pT − pT)2

σ2pT

+∑

i=x,y

(Ui − Ui)2

σ2Ui

+(Mℓν −MW )2

σ2MW

+

(Mjj −MW )2

σ2MW

+(Mℓνj −Mtop)

2

σ2Mtop

+(Mjjj −Mtop)

2

σ2Mtop

. (29)

The first sum in (29) is over the primary lepton ℓ and all jets with raw ET > 8 GeV and |η| < 2.4.The second sum is over the transverse components of the unclustered energy UT , which is defined asthe vector sum of the energies in the calorimeter towers after excluding the primary lepton and alljets with raw ET > 8 GeV and |η| < 2.4. The symbols with a hat represent quantities which are freeto be altered in the fit procedure. The uncertainty on a quantity X is denoted σX and occurs in thedenominator of the respective χ2 terms. σMW

is set to 2.1 GeV/c2, σMtopis set to 2.5 GeV/c2. For

each combination of primary physics objects in an event the χ2 expression (29) is minimized. Thecombination with the lowest χ2 is chosen to be the best fit for that event. Events with their lowestχ2 above 10 are rejected. The fit yields an estimate of Mtop for each event.

The mass fit performance is tested with tt Monte Carlo events. The best results are obtained forevents where all four leading jets are correctly assigned to the appropriate quark. A mass resolutionof 13 GeV/c2 is reached for these events. For events with two secondary vertex tags the correctassignment is made in 49% of the events, while for events without b tag the assignment is correct onlyin 23% of the cases. If the four leading partons from the tt decay cannot be uniquely matched to thefour leading jets within ∆R < 0.4, the mass resolution deteriorates to an average of 34 GeV/c2.

7.1.3. Final selection and backgrounds The final cut in the event selection requires that the χ2 of thebest fit for an event is below 10. The background is estimated using the same methods as discussedfor the tt cross section measurement in section 6.2. In addition, the background is renormalized usinga maximum likelihood fit to the observed rates of events with secondary vertex tag and soft lepton tagand their respective expectations. In the fit the sum of tt signal and background events is constrainedto be equal to the observed number of events. The number of expected and observed events in thefour top mass subsamples are given in table 9.

7.1.4. Top mass determination In a last step the best estimate of the top quark mass is determinedby a maximum likelihood fit to the distribution of reconstructed invariant masses. The shape ofthe reconstructed mass distribution for the tt signal is obtained from Herwig Monte Carlo events.

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 61

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Figure 24. Top quark mass measurement with the template method at CDF in Run I [104]. (a)Top mass distributions of tt signal Monte Carlo for six different values of Mtop (dots). The overlayedcurves are the fitted template functions for that particular top quark mass. (b) The histogram showsthe reconstructed top mass distribution for all subsamples combined. The shaded region indicatesthe fitted signal component, the hatched region the fitted background. The inset shows the loglikelihood as a function of the top quark mass.

Several samples for different top quark masses are generated. The reconstructed mass distributions arereferred to as templates, which provides the name for the entire measurement method. The templatedistributions are parametrized using a function fs that depends on 12 parameters and the top quarkmass. The parameters are determined by a simultaneous χ2 fit to all template histograms. For eachof the four subsamples a different set of parameters is calculated. Figure 24a shows the top masstemplate histograms and the fitted template function for six different values of Mtop. The Vecbos

Monte Carlo program is used to create templates for the background. The background distribution isparametrized by a function fb with fewer parameters and no dependence on Mtop.

Using the template functions and the observed mass distribution a likelihood function is defined.The template parameters and the background fraction are constrained to their central values withintheir uncertainties. The only parameter which is entirely unconstrained is Mtop. The log likelihoodfunction is minimized with respect to all parameters in a combined fit to all subsamples. The resultof the minimization for the combined sample is shown in figure 24b. The minimum of the likelihoodis reached for a top quark mass of Mtop = 176.1+5.2

−5.0 GeV/c2. The given uncertainties are onlystatistical. Systematic uncertainties due to various sources are evaluated. The biggest uncertaintyoriginates from the jet energy measurement (4.4GeV/c2). The modelling of initial and final stateradiation causes an uncertainty of 2.6GeV/c2. The modelling of the shape of the background spectruminduces an uncertainty of 1.3GeV/c2. Smaller sources of uncertainties are: the b tagging efficiency(0.4GeV/c2), parton distribution functions (0.3GeV/c2), and Monte Carlo generators (0.1GeV/c2).The contributions of all effects are added in quadrature resulting in a total systematic uncertainty of5.3GeV/c2.

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 62

7.2. Matrix element method

Originally DØ also used a template method to measure the top quark mass. This method used akinematically fitted mass, similar to CDF, and in addition discriminants based on a likelihood ratioor a neural network [243]. In 2004 DØ reanalyzed its top mass data sample with a new techniquebased on a matrix element method, which we will describe below [106].

The new measurement is based on the same data set of 91 lepton-plus-jets events as the previousone. The basic selection cuts are very similar to those used for the tt cross section measurement [244].The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 125 pb−1. The result of the template analysisis Mtop = 173.3± 5.6 (stat.)± 5.5 (syst.) GeV/c2.

The matrix element method is designed to extract more kinematic information from the eventsthan the previous template methods, and thus yield an improved precision. The basic idea of the newmethod is to exploit the fact that the differential cross section for tt production depends sensitivelyon the top quark mass. The differential cross section can thus be used to calculate a probability fora certain top mass hypothesis. While the differential cross section consists of a phase space term andthe matrix element for tt production, the matrix element is the more significant part, which motivatesthe name of the method. Matrix element methods have already been used previously to analyse ttdilepton events in CDF [245] and DØ [246, 247, 226]. Since leading order matrix elements are usedto calculate the event weights, only events with exactly four jets are used. This jet cut minimizes theeffect of higher-order corrections and reduces the number of events from 91 to 71.

The production probability P (x,Mtop) for a tt event with a measured set of variables x at acertain top quark mass Mtop is given as a convolution of the differential cross section dσ/dy with theparton distribution functions f and the transfer function W (y, x) that maps the measured quantitiesx into the quantities y at parton level:

P (x,Mtop) =1

σtotal

dy dq1 dq2dσ(y,Mtop)

dyf(q1)f(q2)W (y, x) . (30)

The parton distribution functions f(qi) are evaluated for the incoming partons with momentumfraction qi. The integral in (30) is properly normalized by dividing by the total cross section σtotal.The integration runs over fifteen sharply measured variables, which are directly assigned to the partonquantities without invoking a transfer function. These variables are the eight jet angles, the three-momentum of the lepton, and four equations of energy-momentum conservation. The jet energiesare not well measured and a transfer function Wjets(Epart, Ejet) is needed to map jet energies Ejet

measured in the detector to parton level energies Epart. The function Wjets(Epart, Ejet) is a productof four functions F (Ei

part, Eijet), one for each jet in the event. The functional form of F is the sum of

two Gaussians. The parameters of F used for b quarks are different from those for light quark jets.After the first integration step there are five integrals left. One integral runs over the energy of oneof the quarks from the hadronic W decay, the other four are over the masses squared, M2

i , of the twoW bosons and the two reconstructed top quarks in the event. This is an economical choice to safecomputing time. When computing P (x,Mtop) all possible 24 permutations of jet assignments and theneutrino pz solution are considered and the average is computed.

Since the candidate sample still contains a considerable amount of background events, it is usefulto calculate a background probability Pbkg(x) based on the W +4 jets matrix element from Vecbos.Figure 25a shows the Pbkg distribution for the sample of 71 candidate events and an overlay of ttand W + 4 jets Monte Carlo events. To reduce the bias in the top mass measurement due to thebackground content in the sample DØ employs a cut requiring log(Pbkg) < −11. After this cut thefinal top mass sample contains 22 events. The final likelihood for the measurement of Mtop is given

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 63

(a) (b) (c)

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-ln(

L)

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

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1.2

170 180 190Top quark mass (GeV/c2)

L/L

max

Figure 25. (a) Distribution of the logarithm of the background probability Pbkg for 71 candidateevents in the DØ top mass sample [243]. To increase the purity of the sample a cut at log(Pbkg) <−11 is performed, as indicated by the vertical line. The data are compared to tt signal Monte Carlo(left hatched) and W + 4 jets background Monte Carlo events (right hatched). (b) Negative of thelog likelihood as a function of Mtop. (c) The likelihood normalized to its maximum value. The curveis fit to a Gaussian. The hatched area corresponds to the 68.27% probability interval.

by

− lnL(Mtop) = −N∑

i=1

ln[c1Ptt(xi,Mtop) + c2Pbkg(xi)] +

Nc1

A(x)Ptt(x,Mtop) dx+Nc2

A(x)Pbkg(x) dx . (31)

The integrals are calculated using Monte Carlo methods. The acceptance function A(x) is 1.0or 0.0, depending on whether the event is accepted or rejected by the analysis criteria. Thesum runs over all N = 22 candidate events. The best value of Mtop and the parameters ci aredefined by minimizing − lnL(Mtop), which is shown in figure 25b. Figure 25c shows the likelihoodnormalized to its maximum value. The Gaussian fit to the likelihood yields a top quark mass ofMtop = (179.6± 3.6) GeV/c2. Monte Carlo studies show that the extracted top quark mass has to becorrected by a shift of δMtop = +0.5 GeV/c2. The total systematic uncertainty of the measurementis 3.9 GeV/c2 which is dominated by the uncertainty of the jet energy scale (3.3 GeV/c2). The finalresult is Mtop = 180.1± 3.6 (stat.)± 3.9 (syst.) GeV/c2, which is a substantial improvement over theprevious template result. The higher precision is mainly due to two differences in the analyses: (a)Well measured events contribute more than poorly measured ones, since a probability is assigned toeach event, (b) all possible permutations of the reconstruction are included. Thus, the correct solutionalways contributes.

7.3. Top quark mass combination

The best precision on the top quark mass is obtained if the individual measurements in the differenttt channels are combined for each experiment. Further improvement is achieved if the results of thetwo Tevatron experiments, CDF and DØ, are combined. In the all hadronic channel CDF uses adata sample of 136 events with an estimated background of 108± 9 events [236]. A similar templatemethod as described in section 7.1 gives a result of 186 ± 10 (stat.) ± 12 (syst.) GeV/c2. Since thedilepton topology comprises two unobserved neutrinos a straightforward full reconstruction of theevent is not possible. To get an estimate of Mtop on an event-by-event basis a weighting methodis used. For each event a weight distribution is calculated as a function of Mtop. The assignedweight depends on the agreement of the sum of the assumed transverse neutrino momenta withthe observed missing transverse energy. The result in the dilepton channel at CDF is Mtop =

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 64

167.4 ± 10.3 (stat.) ± 4.8 (syst.) GeV/c2 [248]. The statistical uncertainties of the measurementsin the three tt channels are uncorrelated, since the samples are statistically independent. However,the systematic uncertainties are correlated. For simplicity, the correlation is either assumed to be100% or zero. The uncertainties concerning the jet energy scale, the signal model (modelling of ISRand FSR, PDFs and b tagging), and the Monte Carlo generators are set to 100%. The correlation ofuncertainties due to Monte Carlo statistics and the background model are assumed to be zero. Thecombination procedure uses a generalized χ2 method with full covariance matrix and yields a valueof Mtop = (176.1± 6.6) GeV/c2 [104].

In the all hadronic channel DØ has measuredMtop = 178.5±13.7 (stat.)±7.7 (syst.) GeV/c2 [249].In the dilepton channel DØ obtains Mtop = 168.4 ± 12.3 (stat.) ± 3.6 (syst.)GeV/c2 [250]. Thecombination of all tt topologies is entirely dominated by the lepton-plus-jets result described in detail insection 7.2 and yieldsMtop = (179.0±5.1)GeV/c2. Combining all CDF and DØ Run I measurementsthe top quark mass is determined to be

Mtop = (178.0± 4.3) GeV/c2 [1].

7.4. Preliminary Run II results

First preliminary Run II measurements of the top quark mass are now available and prepared forpublication. CDF has been exploring several different techniques for the measurement of Mtop. Thebest single measurement is obtained from an extended mass template technique in the lepton-plus-jetschannel. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to 318 pb−1. The measured invariant massof the hadronic W boson decay is used to reduce the systematic uncertainty on the jet energy scale.In a two-dimensional likelihood fit the top quark mass and the jet energy scale (JES) are obtainedsimultaneously. CDF measures Mtop = 173.5+2.7

−2.6 (stat.)± 2.5 (JES)± 1.7 (syst.)GeV/c2.DØ has presented a preliminary result which is also based on a mass template method. In b tagged

lepton-plus-jets events the top quark mass is found to beMtop = 170.6±4.2 (stat.)±6.0 (syst.)GeV/c2.The analysis is based on a data sample of 229 pb−1 and uses 69 candidate events [251].

7.5. Future prospects

The aim of Run II at the Tevatron is to reach a total uncertainty of 2 to 3 GeV/c2 on Mtop. Atthe LHC the top mass will be measured with negligible statistical uncertainty, while the systematicuncertainty is predicted to be on the order of 1 GeV/c2 towards the end of the running period [5]. Inthis precision regime the concrete definition of the top quark mass becomes relevant. The experimentsmeasure a kinematic top quark mass which is approximately equal to the pole mass that appears inthe perturbative top quark propagator. The ambiguity between pole and kinematic mass is on theorder of 1 GeV and due to the fact that at this level the top quark cannot be treated as a free quarkanymore. At a future linear collider an energy scan in the threshold region for tt production will allowa very precise measurement of the MS mass M top(µ). An uncertainty of 20 MeV is envisaged.

8. Top quark production and decay properties

While the tt cross section and top mass measurements have established data samples that arecompatible with SM top quark production, it is crucial to check whether the candidate events arein agreement with other predictions made for the SM top quark. In this chapter we discuss theinvestigation of various production and decay properties of top quarks: the helicity of W bosonsfrom the top quark decay, the measurement of Rtb, the ratio of branching ratios for t → W + b andt → W + q, the search for the tt tau modes, the analysis of spin correlations among the tt pair, themeasurement of the top quark pT spectrum, and the search for electroweak top quark production.

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 65

8.1. W helicity in top quark decays

As discussed in chapter 3.3 the V −A structure of the electroweak charged current interaction causesthe W bosons from the top quark decay to be polarized. The fraction F0 of longitudinal W bosons(helicity hW = 0) is predicted to be

F0 =M2

top/2M2W

1 +M2top/2M

2W

= (71± 1)% , (32)

where we have used Mtop = (178.0± 4.3) GeV/c2. For W+ bosons the remaining 29% are left-handed(hW = −1), for W− bosons 29% are right-handed (hW = +1). In the SM right-handed W+ andleft-handed W− are strongly suppressed (branching fraction: 0.04%). In the following discussion werefer only to the W+, but imply the CP -conjugate statement for the W−.

8.1.1. The lepton pT spectrum We consider further the leptonic decay of the W boson into eνe orµνµ. The V − A structure of the W boson decay causes a strong correlation between the helicity ofthe W boson and the lepton momentum. Qualitatively, this can be understood as follows: The νℓfrom the W+ decay is always left-handed, the ℓ+ is right-handed. In the case of a left-handed W+

boson angular momentum conservation demands therefore that the ℓ+ is emitted in the direction ofthe W+ spin, that means anti-parallel to the W+ momentum. That is why, charged leptons fromthe decay of left-handed W boson are softer than charged leptons from longitudinal W bosons, whichare mainly emitted in the direction transverse to the W boson momentum. The spectrum of leptonsfrom right-handed W bosons would be even more harder than the one from longitudinal ones, sincethey would be emitted preferentially in the direction of the W momentum. Figure 26a shows thepT distributions of leptons for different W helicities. The significant differences for the three helicitystates are apparent and exploited by a CDF analysis which uses the dilepton and lepton-plus-jetsdata samples [252]. The threshold at 20 GeV/c2 seen in figure 26a is due to the event selection. Outof the standard dilepton sample the helicity analysis uses only those events that feature leptons ofdifferent flavour, one electron and one muon. This additional requirement removes the major part ofthe Drell-Yan background. Seven dilepton events remain. The lepton-plus-jets sample is divided intothree subsamples: (1) events with at least one secondary vertex b tag, (2) events with at least one softlepton tag, but no secondary vertex tag, and (3) events with no b tags. In the first two subsamplesat least three jets with ET > 15 GeV and at least one jet with ET > 8 GeV are required. In thethird subsample at least four jets with ET > 15 GeV are mandatory. All jets are counted in thepseudorapidity region |η| < 2.4.

An unbinned maximum likelihood fit to the observed lepton pT spectrum in each subsample isused to determine the fraction of top quark events that decay to longitudinalW bosons. The likelihoodfunctions for each subsample are added and simultaneously minimized. In the fit function the leptonpT spectrum for each subsample is parametrized as the product of an exponential and a polynomial.Figure 26b shows the observed lepton pT spectrum for the dilepton sample and the sum of all threelepton-plus-jets samples. The figure also shows the fit result (signal + background) and the backgroundcomponent alone. The likelihood fit yields a result of F0 = 0.91±0.37 (stat.)±0.13 (syst.). The largestcontribution to the systematic uncertainty is due to the uncertainty in the top quark mass, δF0 = 0.07.The second largest source of uncertainty (δF0 = 0.06) is due to the normalization uncertainty of thenon-W background which peaks at low pT and thereby mimics the shape of the lepton pT distributioncoming from negative helicity W bosons. Other sources of systematic uncertainties are the b taggingefficiency, Monte Carlo statistics, the modelling of gluon radiation, and uncertainties in the partondistribution functions.

CDF has applied the same method as described above to measure F0 in Run II data. The newanalysis is based on data samples corresponding to 162 pb−1 or 193 pb−1 for the lepton-plus-jets or the

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 66

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Figure 26. (a) Transverse momentum distributions of leptons from the W decay for the threedifferent W helicities. The solid dots are from W+ bosons with negative helicity or W− bosonswith positive helicity. The open circles are from longitudinally polarized W bosons. The closedsquares are for leptons from right-handed W+ bosons or from left-handed W− bosons. All threedistributions are normalized to the same area. The figure is taken from reference [252]. (b) LeptonpT distributions of the CDF Run I W helicity analysis in the lepton-plus-jets and the dileptonsample [252]. The data (dots with error bars) are compared with the result of the combined fit (solidline) and with the background component (dashed line).

dilepton sample, respectively. The result for the combined sample is F0 = 0.31+0.37−0.23 (stat.)±0.17 (syst.)

[253].

8.1.2. Measurement of F0 with the matrix element method DØ has used the matrix element methodthat is employed for the top quark mass measurement, see section 7.2, to determine the longitudinalpolarization fraction F0 [254]. The data sample consists of the same 22 events that are analyzed forthe mass measurement. The tt probability density Ptt(x,F0) includes contributions with longitudinalhelicity (F0) and negative helicity (F−), but only the ratio F0/F− is allowed to vary. The likelihoodmaximization yields F0 = 0.56 ± 0.31 (stat.) ± 0.07 (syst.). The statistical error also contains acontribution from the top quark mass uncertainty which is included in the measurement by integratingover the mass fromMtop = 165 GeV/c2 toMtop = 190 GeV/c2. The result for F0 is in good agreementwith the SM prediction.

8.1.3. The helicity angle cos θℓW Another possibility to measure the polarization of W bosons fromtop quark decays is to reconstruct the helicity angle θℓW , which is defined as the angle between thelepton momentum in the W rest frame and the W momentum in the top quark rest frame. Leptonsfrom the decay of longitudinally polarized W bosons have a symmetric angular distribution of theform 1−cos2 θℓW . Leptons from left-handedW bosons have an asymmetric angular distribution of theform (1−cos θℓW )2, while right-handedW bosons would have a distribution of the form (1+cos θℓW )2.

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Top quark physics in hadron collisions 67

The direct reconstruction of cos θℓW requires information on the top quark and W rest framesand thus, the reconstruction of the respective momenta. Experimentally, the determination of ptop

and pW is difficult, since it relies on the relatively poor measurement of jets and the ET/ . However,there is a very good approximation which relates cos θℓW to the invariant mass of the lepton and theb quark jet from the top quark decay:

M2ℓb =

1

2(M2

top −M2W ) (1 + cos θℓW ) . (33)

Using the quantity M2ℓb instead of cos θℓW circumvents the difficulties related to direct top quark

reconstruction.CDF has exploited relation (33) to search for an anomalously large right-handed fraction F+ ofW

bosons in Run I data [255]. The large top quark mass has led to speculations that the top quark couldplay an active role in electroweak symmetry breaking, which would lead to anomalous electroweakinteractions of the top quark [2]. One possibility are left-right symmetric models that lead to asignificant right-handed fraction of W bosons in top quark decays. An additional V + A componentwould lead to a lower left-handed fraction, but leave the longitudinal fraction F0 unchanged. Forthe analysis CDF uses the same 7 dilepton events as for the lepton pT analysis mentioned earlier insection 8.1.1. Since the tagging of b quark jets is not employed in the dilepton sample, there are fourM2

ℓb combinations for each dilepton event. In the lepton-plus-jets sample at least one b tagged jet isrequired. There are 15 events with exactly one b tag and 5 events with two tags. TheM2

ℓb distributionsare fit to a linear combination of template distributions for the three W polarization states. Only theshape information is used, the normalization is left floating. The fit maximizes a binned likelihood as afunction of fV+A, the right-handed fraction of theWtb vertex. If there are two possible b jets that canbe matched to the primary lepton, the fit is performed to two-dimensional distributions taking bothsolutions into account. The fit result is fV+A = −0.21+0.42

−0.24 (stat.)±0.21(syst.) which is an unphysicalvalue, but gives more preference to the SM V −A interaction rather than a V +A contribution. Thedominating systematic uncertainty is due to the uncertainty in the top quark mass, which contributes0.19 to the total systematic uncertainty of 0.21. The result can be converted into a one-sided upperlimit of fV +A < 0.80 at the 95% confidence level (C.L.). If one assumes the longitudinal fractionto have the SM value this limit corresponds to F+ < 0.24 at the 95% C.L.. This result can becombined with the measurement obtained from the lepton pT analysis. The correlation of the tworesults is about 40%. The combination yields an improved limit of F+ < 0.18 at the 95% C.L., whichis inconsistent with a pure V +A theory at a confidence level equivalent to the probability of a 2.7 σGaussian statistical fluctuation.

In Run II CDF has provided a preliminary measurement of F0 using the M2ℓb method. The

analyzed data sample consists of 31 lepton-plus-jets events with one secondary vertex b tag. Theresulting value is F0 = 0.99+0.29

−0.35 (stat.)± 0.19 (syst.) [253].

8.2. Measurement of Rtb

In the SM the top quark is predicted to decay to a W boson and a b quark with a branching fractionof nearly 100%. This is a consequence of the CKM matrix element |Vtb| being close to unity. Ourknowledge on |Vtb| comes primarily from measurements of b meson decays using the unitarity conditionof the CKM matrix (VV† = V†V = 1). This indirect method yields 0.9990 < |Vtb| < 0.9992 withhigh precision [10]. However, if a fourth generation of quarks was present, unitarity of the CKMmatrix could be violated. Therefore, it is desirable to make a direct measurement of the top quarkbranching fraction to Wb.

In Tevatron Run I CDF has measured the ratio Rtb = BF(t → Wb)/BF(t → Wq), where qcan be any down-type quark [256]. The analysis uses 9 events from the dilepton sample and 163events from the lepton-plus-jets sample. The ratio Rtb is measured from the data by comparing

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the observed number of events with secondary vertex b tags or soft lepton b tags to the number ofexpected events based on the kinematic acceptances, tagging efficiencies and background estimates.Four event categories are considered: (1) events with no b tags, (2) events with one or more softlepton tags, (3) events with exactly one secondary vertex tag, and (4) events with two secondaryvertex tags. In the dilepton sample only secondary vertex b tagging is used. A maximum likelihoodfit yields Rtb = 0.94+0.26

−0.21 (stat.)+0.17−0.12 (syst.), consistent with the SM prediction. The result can also

be expressed as a lower limit: Rtb > 0.56 at the 95% C.L..The CKM matrix element |Vtb| is related to Rtb, although in a model-dependent way. Under the

assumption that the top quark decays only to Wq final states and using three generation unitarityone finds Rtb = |Vtb|2. As a result, CDF finds |Vtb| = 0.97+0.16

−0.12 or |Vtb| > 0.75 at the 95% C.L. [256].In Run II CDF has obtained a preliminary result of this analysis using only the secondary vertex

b tag algorithm and improved the lower limit to Rtb > 0.61 at the 95% C.L. [257]. DØ has performeda similar analysis in the lepton-plus-jets sample using the secondary vertex and the impact parameterb tag method. The preliminary results are Rtb = 0.70+0.27

−0.24 (stat.)+0.11−0.10 (syst.) for the secondary vertex

tagged sample and Rtb = 0.65+0.34−0.30 (stat.)

+0.17−0.12 (syst.) for events with an impact parameter tag [258].

8.3. Search for µτ and eτ top decays in tt events

Up to now the searches for the tt tau decay modes have not produced enough evidence to claim theobservation of this channel. We discuss in this paragraph the latest search by CDF using Run II datacorresponding to an integrated luminosity of 194 pb−1 [259]. The search is carried out in the tt taudilepton channel where one W boson decays into eνe or µνµ and the second W boson decays into τντwith a subsequent hadronic decay of the tau lepton. The branching fraction of this tt mode is about5%, the same size as the classical dilepton channel (ee, eµ, µµ). However, several factors lead to areduced acceptance for the tau mode: the hadronic branching ratio of the tau is 64%, the kinematicacceptance is reduced due to the undetected neutrino, and the tau selection is less efficient than theelectron or muon selection. In total, the event detection efficiency for the tau modes is about fivetimes smaller than the one for the standard dilepton analysis. This fact mainly explains why the taumode so far evaded observation.

The data set for the CDF analysis was selected by a trigger on high-pT electrons and muons.It is the same data set used for the dilepton cross section measurement discussed in section 6.1. Onanalysis level electrons and muons are identified using standard cuts as mentioned in the descriptionof the dilepton analysis. Hadronic tau decays have a distinct signature of narrow isolated jets with lowcharged track multiplicity. A tau candidate is defined by two components: (1) A calorimeter clustercontaining a seed tower with ET > 6GeV and a maximum of five adjacent towers with ET > 1GeV.(2) At least one track with pT > 4.5GeV/c is required to point to the tau calorimeter cluster. Furthercuts are employed to reduce background. A cone is defined around the seed track using a variableradius of θcone = min{0.17, (5GeV)/Ecluster} rad. Within this cone there must be exactly one orthree tracks with pT > 1GeV/c including the seed track. In the case of three tracks, the chargesmust not all be positive or negative. Within an isolation annulus extending from the outer edge ofthe tau cone to 30◦ no tracks or π0 candidates are allowed. The π0 candidates are identified in thecalorimeter by clusters of energy in the shower maximum detector. The transverse momentum of thetau is estimated by the sum of the track pT plus the ET/c of π

0 candidates identified within the taucone. Additional requirements on the tau candidate are pT > 15GeV/c and mcandidate < 1.8GeV/c2.The calorimeter towers within the isolation annulus are required to have ET less than 6% of the taucandidate ET. Electrons or muons that fake tau candidates are removed by asking that the energyin the hadron calorimeter divided by the sum of the tau track momenta is above 0.15, and that theET of the tau calorimeter cluster divided by the tau seed track is above 0.5. Additional requirementson candidate events are: ET/ > 20GeV, and at least two jets within |η| < 2.0. The first jet has to

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have ET > 25GeV, the second jet ET > 15GeV. The scalar sum of the electron or muon pT, thetau pT, the ET/ , and the ET of the jets is defined as HT and must exceed 205 GeV. Including allbranching ratios, kinematic cuts and efficiencies the event detection efficiency for tt events is found tobe ǫevt = (0.080± 0.015)%.

The number of expected tt events is 1.00± 0.17. The estimated background is 1.29± 0.25 events.The dominant contributions to the background are W + jets events where a jet fakes a tau (58%),Z0 → τ+τ−+jets (19%), WW production (11%), and Z0 → e+e−+jets where an electron fakes a tau(6%). In CDF II data two events are observed, compatible with the SM expectation. The significanceof the result is not high enough to claim the observation of the tt tau mode. The result can beconverted into an upper limit on an anomalous enhancement of the t → τντ q rate. An enhancementof more than a factor of 5.2 is excluded at the 95% confidence level. The Run II analysis has improvedthe expected signal to background ratio over the previous Run I tt tau analysis of CDF [260] from0.5 to 0.78. With more data to come in Run II this improvement brings the observation of the tt taumode within reach. In the Run I analysis 4 candidate events are observed over a background of 2events and a signal expectation of 1 event.

8.4. Spin correlations in tt events

As discussed in detail in section 3.3, top quarks decay as quasi-free quarks due to their short lifetime.Thus, the spin information of top quarks is transmitted to the decay products and is accessibleexperimentally. In this way top quarks are a unique laboratory to study spin aspects of heavyquark production, contrary to b quarks where the hadronization to b hadrons removes the initialspin information. At the Tevatron tt pairs are produced unpolarized. However, the spins of the topand antitop quark are expected to have a strong correlation and point along the same axis in the ttrest frame on an event-by-event basis.

An optimal spin quantization axis can be constructed using the velocity β∗ and the scatteringangle θ∗ of the top quark with respect to the centre-of-mass frame of the incoming partons. Thequantization axis forms the angle ψ with respect to the pp beam axis [261]:

tanψ =β∗2 sin θ∗ cos θ∗

1− β∗2 sin2 θ∗. (34)

For the qq → tt process the spins of the top and the antitop quark are fully aligned along the samedirection in this spin basis. If the gluon fusion process gg → tt is included the correlation is reduced.In the limit where the tt pair is produced at rest (β∗ = 0) the spins are pointing along the beam axis.The spin correlation of the tt pair is transmitted to the top quark decay products. Experimentally,it is particularly advantageous to investigate correlations of the primary leptons in tt dilepton events.The observables are the angles θ− and θ+ between the momenta of the negatively or positively chargedleptons in the rest frame of their parent top quark and the spin quantization axis. Using these anglesthe spin correlation can be expressed by the differential cross section [262]

1

σtotal· d2σ

d(cos θ+)d(cos θ−)=

1 + κ cos θ+ cos θ−4

, (35)

where κ is the correlation coefficient which is predicted to be κ = 0.88 at the Tevatron (Run I).The coefficient κ can vary between −1, fully negative correlation, and κ = +1 for a fully positivecorrelation.

The DØ collaboration has searched for evidence of tt spin correlations in Run I data using dileptonevents [263]. Since the angles θ− and θ+ are measured in the top quark rest frame, the top quark hasto be fully reconstructed. In dilepton events this cannot be achieved unambiguously, since the twoneutrinos are not reconstructed. Up to four different solutions per event have to be considered. Aweight is assigned to each solution based on how well the sum of the transverse momenta of the two

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neutrinos in the solution agrees with the measured ET/ . For each solution the leptons are boosted intothe respective top quark rest frame and cos θ+ or cos θ− are computed.

To deduce κ the two-dimensional phase space of (cos θ+, cos θ−) is used in a binned likelihoodanalysis. The bins are filled with the event weights obtained from the event fitter. Since an eventpopulates each bin with fractional probability, the likelihood fit does not use a simple Poissonlikelihood. The correlation between different bins is obtained from Monte Carlo events and the bincontents of the (cos θ+, cos θ−) space are rotated such, that they are uncorrelated. The new variablesare used to construct the likelihood. DØ uses six dilepton data events, three eµ, two ee and one µµevent. The fit result from data is used to compute a lower limit of κ > −0.25 at the 68% confidencelevel, which is in agreement with the SM expectation of κ = 0.88.

8.5. The top quark pT spectrum

The CDF collaboration has further investigated the kinematics of tt events by measuring the topquark pT spectrum [264]. This analysis is partially motivated by exotic models that predict alternativeproduction mechanisms for top quarks at the Tevatron, in particular an enhancement of top quarkswith transverse momentum above 200 GeV/c. The Run I lepton-plus-jets data set with secondaryvertex b tag or soft lepton tag are used in the analysis. The events are subjected to a kinematic fitsimilar to the top quark mass analysis described in section 7.1. The invariant mass reconstructed fromthe top quark decay products is constrained to 175GeV/c2. Events with χ2 > 10 from the fit arerejected. The final data sample contains 61 candidate events. Figure 27a shows the pT distribution ofthe hadronically decaying top quark. The differences in the spectrum do not constitute a significantdeviation from the SM prediction. A maximum likelihood technique is used to estimate the fractionR4 of top quarks in the high transverse momentum region of 225 < pT < 425GeV/c. The measuredfraction is R4 = 0.0+0.04

−0.0 , while the SM expectation is R4 = 0.025. The data result can be convertedinto an upper limit of R4 < 0.16 at the 95% confidence level.

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8.6. Electroweak top quark production

While tt pair production via the strong interaction is the dominant source of top quarks at theTevatron (and also at the LHC), top quarks can also be produced as single quarks via the electroweakinteraction. The theoretical aspects of single top production are discussed in section 3.2 of thisreview. The relevant modes are t-channel and s-channel production, see figure 10. Several analyseshave searched for electroweak top quark production in Tevatron Run I data [266, 267, 268, 269]. Thebest upper limits obtained on the production cross sections in Run I are 13 pb at the 95% C.L. forthe t-channel [268] and 17 pb at the 95% C.L. for the s-channel [267].

The CDF collaboration has published the first search for single top production in Run II [265]. Inthe following paragraphs we will briefly review this analysis which uses a data sample correspondingto an integrated luminosity of (162± 10) pb−1. The event selection is essentially the same as the oneused for the tt cross section measurement in lepton-plus-jets events with secondary vertex b tagging,see section 6.2.2. The jet definition differs in the pseudorapidity range. While the tt cross sectionmeasurement counts jets up to |η| < 2.0, the range is enlarged in the single top analysis to |η| < 2.8.This change is motivated by an increase in acceptance for the t-channel process in theW+2 jets sampleby roughly 30%. Exactly two jets are required. At least one of these jets must be identified as a b quarkjet by a secondary vertex tag. To optimize the sensitivity, CDF applies a cut on the invariant massMℓνb of the charged lepton, the neutrino and the b tagged jet: 140 GeV/c2 ≤Mℓνb ≤ 210 GeV/c2. Thetransverse momentum of the neutrino is set equal to the missing transverse energy vector ET/ ; pz(ν) isobtained up to a two-fold ambiguity from the constraint Mℓν =MW . From the two solutions the onewith the lower |pz(ν)| is chosen. If the pz(ν) solution has non-zero imaginary part as a consequenceof resolution effects in measuring jet energies, only the real part of pz(ν) is used. Two analyses areperformed on this data sample: (1) a separate search, which measures the rates for the two single topprocesses, t-channel and s-channel, individually, and (2) a combined search where t- plus s-channelare treated as one single top signal. For the separate search, the data sample is subdivided into eventswith exactly one b tagged jet or exactly two b tagged jets. For the 1-tag sample, at least one jet isrequired to have ET ≥ 30 GeV.

The event detection efficiency for the signal is determined from events generated by the matrixelement event generator MadEvent [270, 271], followed by parton showering with Pythia [171]and a full CDF II detector simulation. MadEvent features the correct spin polarization of the topquark and its decay products. For t-channel single top production two samples are generated, oneb + q → t + q′ and one g + q → t + b + q′ which are merged together to reproduce the pT spectrumof the b as expected from NLO differential cross section calculations. This is an improved modelcompared to the Pythia modelling used in the Run I analyses. The event detection efficiency ǫevtincludes the kinematic and fiducial acceptance, branching ratios, lepton and b jet identification aswell as trigger efficiencies. In the 1-tag sample one finds ǫevt = (0.86 ± 0.07)% for the t-channel andǫevt = (0.78± 0.06)% for the s-channel.

Two background components are distinguished: tt and nontop background. The nontopbackground is estimated using the same method as used for the tt cross section analysis, seesection 6.2.2. The primary source (62%) of the nontop background is the W+heavy flavour processesqq′ →Wg with g → bb or g → cc, and gq →Wc. Additional sources are “mistags” (25%), in which alight quark jet is erroneously identified as heavy flavour, “non-W”(10%), e.g. direct bb production, anddiboson (WW ,WZ, ZZ) production (3%). The non-W and mistag fractions are estimated using CDFII data. TheW+heavy flavour rates are extracted from Alpgen [178] Monte Carlo events normalizedto data. The diboson rates are estimated from Pythia events normalized to theory predictions [272].After all selection cuts CDF observes 33 events in the 1-tag sample, 6 events in the 2-tag sample, and42 events for the combined search. Within the uncertainties, the observations are in good agreementwith predictions.

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To extract the signal content in data, a maximum likelihood technique is employed. Separation oft- and s-channel events is achieved by using the Q ·η distribution which exhibits a distinct asymmetryfor t-channel events, see figure 27b. Q is the charge of the primary lepton and η is the pseudorapidity ofthe untagged jet. Figure 28a shows CDF data versus stacked Monte Carlo templates weighted by theexpected number of events in the 1-tag sample. The separate search defines a joint likelihood functionfor the Q · η distribution in the 1-tag sample and for the number of events in the 2-tag sample.The background rates are constrained to their SM prediction by Gaussian priors. The systematicuncertainties are taken into account in the likelihood definition. Systematic shifts in the acceptanceand in the shape of the Q · η template histograms, and their full correlation are considered. Thelargest uncertainties on the acceptance are due to the uncertainty on the b tagging efficiency (7%), theluminosity (6%), the top quark mass (4%), and the jet energy scale (4%). The likelihood procedureyields a most probable value of 0.0+4.7

−0.0 pb for the t-channel cross section, and (4.6 ± 3.8) pb for thes-channel cross section. These results are translated into upper limits on the cross sections whichexclude an anomalous enhancement of single top quark production. The upper limit for the t-channelis found to be 10.1 pb at the 95% C.L., the upper limit for the s-channel is 13.6 pb at the 95% C.L..

To measure the combined t-channel plus s-channel signal in data, a kinematic variable is usedwhose distribution is very similar for the two single top processes (see inset of figure 28b), but isdifferent for background processes: HT, which is the scalar sum of ET/ and the transverse energies ofthe lepton and all jets in the event. In figure 28b the HT distribution observed in data is comparedwith the SM prediction. A likelihood function similar to that of the separate search yields a mostprobable value of 7.7+5.1

−4.9 pb for the single top cross section. The resulting upper limit is 17.8 pb atthe 95% C.L.. The quoted result (combined search) excludes an anomalous enhancement of singletop production which is more than 6.1 times larger than the SM production. However, separatemeasurements of the t-channel and s-channel are important because the two processes are sensitiveto different new physics contributions, see for example references [273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 278].

DØ has presented results on a single top search using neural networks [279]. With a data sample

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corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 230 pb−1 DØ can set an upper limit of 5.0 pb at the95% C.L. on the t-channel cross section and 6.4 pb at the 95% C.L. on the s-channel cross section.With more data at the Tevatron to come, a first observation of electroweak top quark productionis in reach within the next years. Preliminary studies indicate that data corresponding to about1.5 fb−1 will allow to establish evidence for electroweak top quark production at a probability levelexcluding a background fluctuation that is equivalent to a 3 σ deviation in a Gaussian distribution.Once electroweak top quark production is observed the measurement of the production cross sectionwill allow to directly extract the CKM matrix element |Vtb|.

9. Search for anomalous couplings

Mainly because of its large mass the top quark has fostered speculations that it offers a unique windowto search for physics beyond the SM. One possibility to test this hypothesis is to measure top quarkproperties and check whether the observation is in agreement with the SM prediction. This approachis based on the measurements that are discussed in previous chapters, involving properties such as thett cross section, the top mass, or the W helicity in top quark decays. A second approach is to searchdirectly for new particles coupling to the top quark or for non-SM decays. In this section we presentthose topics which have led to specific analyses at the Tevatron. In section 9.4 we will additionallydiscuss searches for anomalous single top quark production at HERA and LEP.

9.1. Decays to a charged Higgs boson

In the SM a single complex Higgs doublet scalar field is responsible for breaking the electroweaksymmetry and generating the masses of gauge bosons and fermions. Many extensions of the SMinclude a Higgs sector with two Higgs doublets and are therefore called Two Higgs Doublet Models(THDM). In a THDM electroweak symmetry breaking leads to five physical Higgs bosons: two neutralCP -even scalars h0 and H0, one neutral CP -odd pseudoscalar A0, and a pair of charged scalars H±.The extended Higgs sector is described by two parameters: the mass of the charged Higgs, MH+ ,and tanβ = v1/v2, the ratio of the vacuum expectation values v1 and v2 of the two Higgs doublets.One distinguishes two types of THDMs. In a type I THDM only one of the Higgs doublets couplesto fermions, in a type II THDM the first Higgs doublet couples to the up-type quarks (u, c, t) andneutrinos, while the second doublet couples to down-type quarks (d, s, b) and charged leptons. Theanalyses we discuss in this section are concerned with type II models. A particular example for a typeII THDM is the minimal supersymmetric model (MSSM).

If the charged Higgs boson is lighter than the difference of top quark and b quark mass,MH± < Mtop−Mb, the decay mode t→ H+b is possible and competes with the SM decay t→W+b.The branching fraction depends on tanβ and MH+ . The MSSM predicts that the channel t → H+bdominates the top quark decay for tanβ . 1 and tanβ & 70. In most analyses it is assumedthat BF(t → W+b) + BF(t → H+b) = 1. At tree level the H± does not couple to vector bosons.Therefore, the H± decays only to fermions. In the parameter region tanβ < 1 the dominant decaymode is H+ → cs, while for tanβ > 1 the decay channel H+ → τ+ντ is the most important one. Fortanβ > 5 the branching fraction to τ+ντ is nearly 100%. Thus, in this region of parameter space typeII THDM models predict an excess of tt events with tau leptons over the SM expectation.

First searches for the H± in top quark events were already performed well before the top quarkwas discovered in 1994/95. The UA1 and UA2 experiments at the CERN SppS excluded certainregions of the Mtop versus MH± plane [280, 281]. First searches of CDF improved these limits usingevents with a dilepton signature [282] or reconstructing tau leptons in their hadronic decay mode [283].

At LEP the experiments searched for charged Higgs production in the process e+e− → H+H−.The analyses encompass the final states cscs, τ+ντ τ

−ντ , csτ−ντ , and τ

+ντ cs. The combined result of

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all four experiments excludes charged Higgs masses below 78.6GeV/c2 [284]. The CLEO collaborationhas used its measurement of the inclusive b→ sγ cross section to set an indirect limit on the chargedHiggs mass [285]. The dependence of the cross section on MH± enters via quantum corrections. Sincethe process b → sγ occurs only at loop level in the SM, its sensitivity to new particles which mightbe exchanged in the loop is quite high. CLEO sets a limit of MH± > (244+ 63/(tanβ)1.3)GeV/c2 atthe 95% C.L., under the assumption that a type II THDM is realized in nature. If the Higgs sectorhas a richer structure, the CLEO limit can be circumvented. Therefore, direct searches for the H±

which are less model dependent remain important.After the top quark discovery the H± searches at the Tevatron looked for the decay modes

tt→ H±W∓bb and tt→ H±H∓bb. CDF published three analyses where the charged Higgs is assumedto decay into τ+ντ and the tau lepton subsequently decays semi-hadronically into a tau neutrino plushadrons [286, 287, 288]. The identification of hadronic tau decays in these CDF analyses is similarto the one described in detail in section 8.3. Two analyses (references [286, 287]) used an inclusiveapproach, based on final states with missing transverse energy, one identified hadronic tau decay, jetsor high-pT leptons. One analysis (reference [288]) requires one high-pT lepton (e or µ) in the event,which can originate from the decay W → e/µ + ν or H+ → τ+ντ → ντ + e+/µ+ + νe/µ + ντ . Thebest exclusion limit is obtained from the inclusive analysis [287]: For MH± = 80GeV/c2 the regionof tanβ & 25 is excluded. For higher Higgs masses the exclusion becomes less stringent, reachingtanβ & 200 at MH± = 160GeV/c2.

The first DØ search for the H± is based on a disappearance strategy, looking for a deficit ofevents in the SM lepton-plus-jets channel [289]. Since good agreement between the SM prediction andthe observation is found, certain regions of phase space for charged Higgs production can be excluded.This result is superseded by a direct search for hadronic tau decays in top quark events [290]. In thefollowing paragraph we will discuss this last Run I analysis on the charged Higgs in more detail.

The DØ analysis uses data taken with a multijet + ET/ trigger corresponding to (62.3±3.1) pb−1 ofintegrated luminosity. Relatively loose preselection cuts are applied, followed by tighter cuts involvingan artificial neural network. The preselection requires that ET/ > 25GeV, at least four jets withET > 20GeV each, but no more than eight jets with ET > 8GeV. The selection is sensitive tott → H±W∓bb events where the W boson decays into quarks as well as tt → H±H∓bb events.The network has three input variables: the ET/ and two of the three eigenvalues of the normalizedmomentum tensor. The training is done with charged Higgs events generated by Isajet [291] for thesignal and with 25000 multijet events from data for the background. Figure 29a shows the number ofremaining events in data versus the cut on the neural network output. Overlaid is the number of eventsexpected from the SM as well as one scenario including a charged Higgs boson withMH± = 95GeV/c2.The data show good agreement with the SM expectation, thereby falsifying the chosen H± scenario.Based on a series of Monte Carlo experiments the sensitivity for the H± search is optimized yieldingon optimal cutoff at 0.91.

After the neural network cut hadronic tau decays are identified in the data. A narrow jet with∆R < 0.25 is required, with 1 to 7 tracks in the jet cone. Events with identified muons or electronsare rejected. In addition, a χ2 requirement is constructed using calorimeter information fromW → τνMonte Carlo events. After all cuts 3.2±1.5 multijet background events are expected, 1.1±0.3 from ttand 0.9±0.3 fromW+jets. In data DØ observes three events. A Bayesian and a Frequentist statisticalanalysis are used to deduce exclusion regions is the (MH± , tanβ) phase space shown in figure 29b.Under the assumption that Mtop = 175GeV/c2 and σ(tt) = 5.5 pb, the region of tanβ > 32.0 isexcluded at the 95% C.L. for MH± = 75GeV/c2. For Higgs masses above 150 GeV/c2 no limits canbe set. This result can also be interpreted in terms of the branching fraction of t → H+b, setting alower limit of BF(t→ H+b) > 0.36 at the 95% C.L..

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ass

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Figure 29. Search for the H± at DØ in Run I [290]. (a) The number of observed events in dataversus the cut on the neural network output (dots). Overlaid is the expectation from the SM (lightshaded area) and a scenario with additional H± production in top quark decays for tanβ = 150 andMH± = 95GeV/c2. (b) Exclusion region at the 95% confidence level in (MH± , tanβ) space. Thetop quark mass is assumed to be 175 GeV/c2 and σ(tt) = 5.5 pb. The plot also contains the regionsexcluded by the indirect search method [289], where DØ looks for a potential disappearance of thett signal.

9.2. Search for X0 → tt decays

Several extensions of the SM predict the existence of narrow resonances that decay to tt pairs. Onesuch model is, for example, a Z ′ predicted by top-colour-assisted technicolour [292]. This modelspeculates that the spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry is related to the observed fermionmasses, in particular the large top quark mass, and can be accomplished by dynamical effects [293].

CDF and DØ have performed model-independent searches for a narrow resonance X0 whichdecays into a tt pair [294, 295]. Both analyses relate closely to the respective top quark massmeasurements of the two experiments [224, 243] and employ fits to the invariant mass spectrumof the tt pair. DØ obtains a slightly better mass limit. The DØ analysis is based on data withan integrated luminosity of 130 pb−1 and uses events with a lepton-plus-jets signature passing thetopological and the soft muon b tag selection. The events are subjected to a kinematic fit thatcomprises kinematic constraints on the reconstructed W boson mass and the top quark mass. Out ofall possible permutations the option with the best χ2 is chosen. The χ2 is required to be below 10.After all cuts 41 events are left in the data sample. Figure 30a shows the invariant mass distribution ofthe tt pair reconstructed from data. The data are fit to distributions for the combined QCD multijetand W+ jets background, SM tt production, and a signal for X0 → tt. For comparison to the datafigure 30a shows the backgrounds and the signal component (MX = 400GeV/c2) obtained from the fit.There is no significant deviation from the SM prediction. The fit is repeated for several assumptionsfor the X0 mass, again without providing evidence for a signal. Therefore, upper limits on the X0

production cross section times branching ratio to tt are set, ranging from 5.0 pb atMX = 400GeV/c2

to 1.5 pb at MX = 850GeV/c2. The confidence level is 95%. These limits are valid as long as thewidth of the resonance, ΓX , is small compared to the DØ detector resolution. The limits quoted aboveassume a width of ΓX = 0.012MX. If one compares the cross section limits with the predictions fora leptophobic Z ′ boson, one can obtain a lower limit on the Z ′ mass: MZ′ > 560GeV/c2.

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(a) (b)

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Figure 30. (a) Invariant mass distribution of the reconstructed tt pair of 41 events in the DØlepton-plus-jets data sample [295]. The solid histogram shows the shape of the W+ jets and QCDmultijets background, the hatched histogram the sum of all SM backgrounds including tt production,and the open histogram shows the sum of signal (MX = 400GeV/c2) and background as obtainedfrom the fit to the data. (b) Feynman diagram for the FCNC decay t → cZ0 with Z → e+e−. Otherdiagrams involve the d and the s quark within the loop instead of the b quark. All diagrams togethernearly cancel and cause the branching ratio of this decay to be very small, O(10−12), in the SM.

9.3. FCNC decays

In the SM flavour changes at leading order (tree level) are induced by charged currents, the exchangeof W bosons. Flavour changing neutral currents (FCNC) are only possible at higher orders inperturbation theory (loop level). FCNC decays of the top quark are strongly suppressed in the SMdue to the Glashow-Iliopoulos-Maiani (GIM) mechanism [296]. Compared to the top quark mass themasses of down-type quarks (d, s, b) occurring in loop diagrams are small and degenerate. Therefore,the sum over the respective amplitudes nearly cancels. Fig. 30b shows one of the Feynman diagramsthat describe the decay t→ cZ0. This type of diagram is also called penguin diagram. The SM predictsthe branching fractions for t→ cZ0 and t→ cγ to be on the order of 10−12, while BF(t→ cg) ≃ 10−10

and BF(t→ cH0) ≃ 10−13 [297].In extensions of the SM FCNC top quark decays can be considerably enhanced by several orders

of magnitude if FCNC couplings at tree level are allowed [298, 299, 300]. In Two Higgs Doublet Modelswhere the neutral scalar h0 posses flavor changing couplings the decay t → ch0 can be considerablyenhanced [301]. A similar enhancement can be reached in supersymmetric models were R-parity isviolated [302]. In topcolour-assisted technicolour theories the branching ratio for t → cW+W− canreach values up to 10−3 [303]. Since the SM predictions for FCNC interactions have much smallerrates, they are useful probes for new physics beyond the SM.

The CDF collaboration has searched for the FCNC decays t → qZ0 and t → qγ in Run I datawith an integrated luminosity of 110 pb−1 [304]. The Z0 is measured in the decay channels e+e− orµ+µ−. Electron and muon identification is described in section 4.5.1. A Photon is identified as anenergy cluster in the electromagnetic calorimeter with no track pointing at it. Additionally, a cluster

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with a single soft track pointing to it is accepted as a photon, if the track carries less than 10% ofthe cluster energy. A typical photon cluster consists of two adjacent towers in the electromagneticcalorimeter. The direction of the photon is defined by the line between the event vertex and thecentroid of the electromagnetic shower as measured in the shower maximum detector. Backgroundfrom hadronic jets is reduced by demanding that the photon cluster is isolated from other energydepositions in the electromagnetic or the hadron calorimeter. In addition, the ratio of hadronic toelectromagnetic energy is constrained to be less than 0.055+0.00045E, where E is the sum of hadronicand electromagnetic energy of the cluster measured in the calorimeter.

The search strategy for the FCNC decays tries to isolate tt events where one top quark decaysvia FCNC and the second top quark decays according to the SM decay t → W+b. In the t → qγsearch two signatures are considered, where the W boson decays either leptonically into eνe or µνµor hadronically into quarks. In the first subsample a well identified charged lepton (e or µ) withpT > 20GeV/c, ET/ > 20GeV, a photon with ET > 20GeV, and at least two jets with ET > 15GeVare required. The second subsample contains events with at least four jets and one photon withET > 50GeV. At least one jet must be identified as a b quark jet with a secondary vertex tag. Inboth subsamples, there must be a photon-plus-jet combination with an invariant mass in the topquark mass window 140 < Mjγ < 210GeV/c2. In the hadronic subsample, the remaining jets musthave

ET ≥ 140GeV. One event passes all selection criteria. The event features a 72GeV muon,ET/ = 24GeV, a 88GeV photon, and three jets. The background is expected to be about 0.5 events,mainly from Wγ production with two additional jets.

In the t → qZ0 search, the W from the second top quark decay is considered to decayhadronically, while the Z0 is reconstructed in its leptonic decay modes to e+e− or µ+µ−. Thisyields an event signature of four jets and two leptons with an invariant mass close to the Z0 mass(75 < Mℓℓ < 105GeV/c2). Since the branching ratio of Z0 → ℓ+ℓ− is small, the total detectionefficiency of the t → qZ0 mode is much smaller than the one for the t → qγ search. Each of the fourjets must have ET > 20GeV and |η| < 2.4. One Z → µ+µ− event passes all selection criteria. Theexpected background is 0.6 events.

Since no statistically significant excess is observed in both searches, the data are used to set upperlimits on the top quark branching ratios into FCNC decays

BR (t→ u/c+ γ) < 3.2% BR(

t→ u/c+ Z0)

< 33% (36)

at the 95% confidence level. These limits are still far from the interesting region. At the LHCexperiments will reach a sensitivity level of 10−4 [5], and thereby reach a region where some modelspredicting very large enhancements can be excluded [305].

9.4. Anomalous single top production

At the Tevatron the search for anomalously enhanced FCNC in top quark decays is statisticallyrestricted by the number of tt pairs produced. More stringent limits on anomalous tqγ of tqZ couplingsat tree level are set by searching for the production of single top quarks via FCNC at LEP and HERA.At LEP all four experiments have searched for the reactions e+e− → tc/tu and presented upper limitson anomalous couplings [306, 307, 308, 309]. The limits obtained by the L3 collaboration are shownin figure 31. For κγ = 0 the coupling to the tqZ coupling is constrained by κZ < 0.41, for κZ = 0the tqγ coupling is confined to κγ < 0.49. Both limits are taken at the 95% confidence level. Theother LEP collaborations obtain very similar results. Figure 31 also visualises the limits that resultfrom the CDF analysis discussed in section 9.3. The LEP results can be translated into limits on thebranching ratios: BR(t→ u/c+ γ) < 4.2% and BR(t→ u/c+ Z0) < 14% [308].

At HERA the two experiments H1 and ZEUS searched for top quarks produced in the inclusiveFCNC reaction ep → etX [310, 311]. The SM process for single top production at HERA is the

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0.2

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uZ|

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Figure 31. Limits at the 95% confi-dence level on anomalous couplingsκtuγ and κtuZ (in this plot notedas vtuZ) of the top quark to the γor the Z boson from reference [310].The plot shows the limits obtainedby the HERA experiments H1 andZEUS [310, 311], by L3 [307] and byCDF [304] (see section 9.3).

Z0

q

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t

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t

Figure 32. Feynman diagramsfor single top production via 2 →2 FCNC processes in hadroncollisions.

charged current reaction ep → νtbX [312] with a predicted cross section of less than 1 fb [113], wellbelow the sensitivity of the experiments. An observed excess in this channel can therefore signalphysics beyond the SM. ZEUS has analyzed a data sample corresponding to 130 pb−1 of integratedluminosity. The top quark is assumed to decay according to the SM decay t→W+b. The W boson isdetected in its leptonic and the hadronic decays channels. The observed data are in good agreementwith the background expectation. Thus, ZEUS is able to compute an upper limit on the anomaloustuγ coupling: κtuγ < 0.174 at the 95% confidence level, which is the best limit on this quantity todate. The ZEUS result is depicted in figure 31.

The H1 analysis uses data with an integrated luminosity of 118.3 pb−1 [310]. In the leptonicchannel five events are observed over a SM background of 1.31 ± 0.22. If this excess is attributedto FCNC top quark production a total cross section of σ(ep → etX) = 0.29+0.15

−0.14 pb is found. Inthe hadronic channel there is no excess in the data. Only more data will help to decide whether theobservation is a real signal or just a statistical fluctuation.

At the Tevatron there are no searches for anomalous single top quark production yet. PossibleFCNC processes at tree level could be q1q1 → tq2, q1q2 → tq2, qg → tg, and gg → tq. ExampleFeynman diagrams for these processes are shown in figure 32. Another option for FCNC top quarkproduction is the 2 → 1 quark-gluon fusion process g + u/c → t. Studies at parton level suggestthat the anomalous up quark coupling parameter κtug/Λ can be measured down to 0.02 TeV−1 inRun II of the Tevatron [275]. For the anomalous charm quark coupling parameter κtcg/Λ a bound of0.06 TeV−1 is in reach. Studies with a fast detector simulation for ATLAS indicate a similar reach atthe LHC [313].

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10. Summary and outlook

Ten years after the discovery of the top quark many of its properties have been thoroughly investigated.All measurements are in good agreement with the predictions made by the Standard Model (SM).At the Tevatron and at LHC the production of tt pairs is the dominating source of top quarks. Theexperiments CDF and DØ have established tt signals in the dilepton, the lepton-plus-jets and the allhadronic channels and measured the production cross section. The tt channels involving tau leptonshave not been observed yet, but they are well within reach in Run II at the Tevatron.

The most important parameter of the top quark is its mass. The large value ofMtop distinguishesthe top quark strongly from the other quarks, since it decays essentially as a free quark. Thus, thetop quark is an ideal laboratory to study polarization effects in heavy quark production and decay.Via higher order perturbative corrections the top quark mass is strongly correlated with the W bosonmass and the Higgs boson mass. Therefore, electroweak precision tests and predictions of MH arevery sensitive to Mtop. The final combined Run I result on the top quark mass yields: Mtop =(178.0± 4.3)GeV/c2. Run II measurements are underway. First preliminary measurements indicatea slightly lower mass value. CDF finds Mtop = 173.5+2.7

−2.6 (stat.)± 2.5 (JES)± 1.7 (syst.)GeV/c2, DØMtop = 170.6 ± 4.2 (stat.) ± 6.0 (syst.)GeV/c2. At the end of Run II the top quark mass will bemeasured with an uncertainty of 2 to 3GeV/c2. At the LHC the precision of Mtop will reach about1 GeV/c2. A limiting factor will be the theoretical understanding of the relation between the kinematicquark mass measured by experiments and the theoretically well defined pole mass or MS mass. Thefinal word on Mtop will come from an e+e− linear collider where a scan of the tt production thresholdwill allow for a precision of about 20MeV/c2.

After the discovery of the top quark the focus of research by the CDF and DØ collaborationsshifted to a detailed investigation of its production and decay properties. The helicity of W bosonsfrom the top quark decay was measured and found to agree with the SM V −A theory of the electroweakinteraction. The ratio of branching ratios Rtb = BF(t→Wb)/BF(t→Wq) was determined and foundto agree with a value close to 1 as predicted by the SM. DØ has investigated tt dilepton events for spincorrelations among the two charged leptons, CDF has measured the top quark pT spectrum. Bothanalyses show no significant deviations from the SM. The search for electroweak single top quarkproduction is about to reach a critical phase in Run II. A discovery of this top quark production modeis around the corner.

Its large mass is motivation to view the top quark as an ideal probe for new physics beyond theSM. Already before the top quark discovery the search for the decay t→ H+b started. CDF and DØsearched also for a heavy resonance which decays into a tt pair. A CDF analysis looked for FCNCdecays of the top quark. No indication of these phenomena beyond the SM is found.

The LHC will be a top quark factory where several millions of top quarks will be produced peryear. This wealth of data will allow to enter a precision era of top quark physics where top quarkproperties will be very accurately investigated. The Tevatron analyses provide an excellent basis forfurther studies at the LHC. But also new topics where huge amounts of data are needed will becomeaccessible at the LHC, for example, the search for like sign top pair production (tt or tt), production ofsingle top quarks via FCNC, the search for CP violation in tt production, or the direct measurement ofthe electric charge of the top quark. The abundance of analysis topics and open questions guaranteesthat top quark physics will remain a lively and thrilling field of elementary particle research in thecoming years which will see the end of Run II at the Tevatron and the turn on of the LHC.

Acknowledgments

I am indebted to my colleagues from the Tevatron experiments CDF and DØ who have devotedtheir energy and intellect to build and operate these superb telescopes to investigate the microcosm.

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Without their dedication to thoroughly analyze the data and produce first class physics resultsthis review would not have been possible. I also want to thank Prof. Dr. Thomas Muller for hisencouragement to write this review article and reading the manuscript.

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